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Minnesota Center for Health Statistics

Minnesota Vital Statistics System

The Minnesota Vital Statistics System (MVSS) is a part of the Minnesota Center for Health Statistics (MCHS) at the Minnesota Department of Health. The MVSS compiles statistical data on all births, deaths, infant deaths, and fetal deaths to Minnesota residents. These data are provided to MVSS by the Office of Vital Records, the state entity responsible for registering the facts of birth and death in the State of Minnesota using information submitted by hospitals, clinics, or medical examiners.

The MCHS creates statistical files that are used to monitor trends in vital statistics (e.g., pregnancy risk factors, birth outcomes, and causes of death), for the state overall and for specific subgroups (e.g., race, age, or county of residence). These data allow MDH and public health partners to identify emerging issues, develop tailored prevention or intervention programs, and monitor progress in addressing health disparities. Summary statistics are reported each year in the Annual Health Summary, County Health Tables, and Vital Statistics Trend Reports located on our website.

Follow these links to learn more about:


Natality (Births)

Natality data are used to monitor trends in mother and infant health during pregnancy, labor and delivery, and birth. Risk factors for poor birth outcomes for both mothers and infants can be identified by studying prenatal care utilization, pregnancy complications, trends in C-section, and other risk factors for poor birth outcomes (e.g., low birth weight, preterm delivery) many of which differ by race/ethnicity, age, education, and urban/rural status.

Key Natality Statistics for Minnesota in 2016

  • Number of births: 69,736
  • Birth rate: 12.6 per 1,000 population
  • Fertility rate: 66.2 births per 1,000 women aged 15-44 years
  • Percent born low birth-weight: 6.6%
  • Percent preterm (< 37 weeks gestation): 8.8%

For related U.S.-wide information, please see the National Natality Statistics.


Mortality (Deaths)

While death is inevitable, public health concerns arise when preventable causes of death increase (e.g., influenza) or when new causes of death emerge (e.g., opioids). Mortality data are used to monitor death rates and causes of death. Mortality rates and leading causes of death vary greatly by age, race/ethnicity, and geography.

Key Mortality Statistics for Minnesota in 2016

  • Number of deaths: 43,050
  • Mortality rate (all causes): 778.7 per 100,000 population
  • Leading causes of death:
    • Cancer (23% of deaths): 178.1 per 100,000
    • Heart Disease (18% of deaths): 141.5 per 100,000
    • Accidents (6% of deaths): 48.1 per 100,000

For related U.S.-wide information, please see the National Mortality Statistics.

Infant/Fetal Mortality

An infant death is the death of an infant born alive that dies before its first birthday. Infant deaths are typically classified in two categories (neonatal and postneonatal deaths), which vary in terms of risks factors and causes. Leading causes of infant death are birth defects, preterm and low birthweight, sudden infant death syndrome, pregnancy complications, and injuries.

A separate, but related, event is fetal death. A fetal death (also called a stillbirth) is the death of a fetus that is at least 20 weeks gestation but dies before it is born. Fetal deaths effect about 1% of all pregnancies in the US but causes of fetal death are poorly understood. Known contributors include birth defects and genetic problems, problems with the placenta or umbilical cord, or health conditions of the mother such as uncontrolled diabetes.

Key Fetal/Infant Mortality Statistics for Minnesota in 2016

  • Number of infant deaths (Infants aged < 1 year): 357
    • Number of neonatal deaths (Infants aged < 28 days): 242
    • Number of postneonatal deaths (Infants aged 28 days to < 1 year): 115
  • Fetal (Stillbirth) deaths (20+ weeks gestation): 420
  • Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births: 5.1
    • Neonatal mortality rate per 1,000 live births: 3.5
    • Postneonatal mortality rate per 1,000 live births: 1.6
  • Fetal mortality rate per 1,000 live births + fetal deaths: 5.3

For related U.S.-wide information, please see the National Infant Mortality Statistics and the National Fetal Death Statistics.

 

Related resources

 

Updated Wednesday, July 11, 2018 at 03:13PM