Lead Poisoning Prevention - Guidelines - EH: Minnesota Department of Health
Lead Poisoning Prevention

Guidelines

MDH has published several guidelines to aid health care professionals and physicians in identifying lead poisoning in children and adults and how to treat it.

Blood Lead Screening Guidelines for Minnesota (March 2000)

The Blood Lead Screening Guidelines for Minnesota were officially released in March 2000. They recommend physicians order blood tests for 1) children residing in specific geographic areas that have a high rate of elevated blood lead cases, and 2) children matching specific demographic groups that have a high rate of elevated blood lead. The guidelines are endorsed by the Minnesota Medical Association (MMA), the Minnesota Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians (MAFP), and Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Plus of Minnesota.

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Blood Lead Screening Guidelines for Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women in Minnesota (August 2015)

In August 2015, the Minnesota Department of Health updated their “Blood Lead Screening Guidelines for Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women in Minnesota”. The new guidelines are consistent with the updated Elevated Blood Lead Level (EBLL) definition of 5mcg/dL. They are designed to assist practitioners in screening and treating pregnant and breastfeeding women with elevated blood lead levels.  Exposure during pregnancy is of particular concern because lead can be passed to the developing fetus during pregnancy or to the infant during breastfeeding. These guidelines serve to ensure that both women and their children receive proper interventions and treatment to reduce lead exposure.

The guidelines are available as a convenient one page "Quick Reference" that contains reference tables and a questionnaire:
Click image to download the Quick Reference Guide (PDF)
  • Risk Screening Questionnaire for Pregnant Women
  • Examples of Lead-Related Occupations and Industries
  • Blood Lead Level (BLL) Actions for Pregnant Women
In addition, the full guidelines also contain:
Click image to download the full Blood Lead Screening Guidelines
  • Examples of Traditional and Alternative Remedies and Products Associated with Lead Contamination
  • Recommended timing of follow-up testing for infants based on initial venous or umbilical cord blood test results

 

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Childhood Blood Lead Case Management Guidelines for Minnesota
(June 2001/Revised June 2006/Revised March 2011)

The Childhood Blood Lead Case Management Guidelines for Minnesota were officially released in June 2001. In 2006, the guidelines were revised to reflect current state statute, and the knowledge gained in the previous five years of implementation. As part of the revision, the full report title was changed to, Childhood Blood Lead Case Management Guidelines for Minnesota - Reference Manual to more accurately reflect the document's purpose, while the condensed version's title (Appendix C below) did not change. The documents are intended as tools that case managers can use to provide consistent and comprehensive case management.

Appendix C can be used for quick verification of what interventions are recommended for each blood lead level. The reference manual is more comprehensive and includes recommended qualifications for the case manager, protocols for the home visit, a list of referrals for services and information, action plans for various blood lead levels (ranging from non-detect to emergency medical situation), a review of case closure thresholds, and a glossary of commonly used lead terms. The guidelines were endorsed in 2001 by the MMA, the Minnesota Chapter of the AAP, the MAFP, and the Minnesota Nurses Association (MNA).

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Childhood Blood Lead Clinical Treatment Guidelines for Minnesota (July 2001, updated March 2011)

The Childhood Blood Lead Clinical Treatment Guidelines for Minnesota were officially released in July 2001. They represent the consensus opinion of eight physicians experienced in treating patients with an elevated blood lead level. The issue discussed the most in the work group was the efficacy of chelation therapy, and the blood lead level above which chelation is appropriate. The guidelines are endorsed by the MMA, the Minnesota Chapter of the AAP, the MAFP, and the MNA.

For more information about Lead Training go to HUD's training site.

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Updated Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 07:48AM