Starting Meats and Textures -

Starting Meats and Textures

Infant Card 6


MN WIC Program

  1. Breastfeeding Your Baby
  2. Bottlefeeding Your Baby
  3. Your Baby Knows How Much Is Enough
  4. Starting Solids
  5. Teaching Your Baby to Use a Cup
  6. Starting Meats and Textures
  7. Starting Table and Finger Foods
  8. Time to Stop Using the Bottle

Breastmilk or formula is the most important food for your baby until 12 months of age. Try different food textures as your baby is ready.

Texture

  • Your baby will move from puréed foods to foods with more texture as she grows. Offer soft, mashed foods with tiny lumps when your baby can chew from side-to-side (not just up and down). Try these foods:

• Cooked noodles
• Mashed, cooked whole peas
• Applesauce
• Mashed potatoes

  • Offer ground, finely chopped foods to baby when ready. When your child picks up foods in her fingers or palms, puts food in her mouth and chews, she is ready for finger foods. Babies like to practice picking up food! Try:

• Ground meat
• Crackers
• Soft cooked vegetables
• Dry cereal
• Soft ripe fruit pieces
• Canned fruit


Meats

  • If you choose baby food meats, choose plain, puréed ones. They have more protein than mixed dinners. For example, it takes about 5 jars of chicken noodle dinner to equal the protein in 1 jar of strained chicken.
  • If you choose table meat, grind or finely chop it and add a bit of water, breastmilk or formula to it. It’s easier to eat meats this way.
  • Try one new meat at a time to make sure it agrees with your baby.
  • Offer other protein foods such as mashed beans, eggs, cottage cheese or cheese.

Juices

  • Babies don’t need juice. Breastmilk or formula have all the vitamin C babies need.
  • If you choose to give juice to your baby, give 2 ounces of 100% juice a day from a cup.
  • Too much juice can mean poor growth and development and can fill your baby up so she isn’t hungry for food, breastmilk or formula.

Feeding Plan

Choose the column that is best for your baby.

Your baby may eat more or less than this. Let her decide how much is enough. Some days she will eat more because she has little "growth spurts."

Meal/Snack Puréed foods Mashed foods Ground/finely chopped foods
Breakfast

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2-3 Tbsp. puréed fruit
• 2-4 Tbsp. infant cereal

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2-3 Tbsp. mashed fruit
• 2-4 Tbsp. infant cereal

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2-3 Tbsp. chopped soft fruit
• 2-4 Tbsp. infant cereal

Lunch

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2 Tbsp. cooked puréed vegetable

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2 Tbsp. mashed vegetable
• 1-2 Tbsp. meat (strained, ground or chopped)

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2 Tbsp. cooked chopped vegetable
• 1-2 Tbsp. meat (ground or chopped)

Snack

• Breastmilk or 2 oz. formula or water in a cup

• 2 oz water in a cup
• Hard toast or Zwieback

• 2 oz water in a cup
• Dry cereal or Zwieback

Dinner

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2 Tbsp. cooked puréed vegetable
• 2 Tbsp. infant cereal

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2 Tbsp. mashed vegetable
• 1-2 Tbsp. meat (strained, ground or chopped)
• 2 Tbsp. mashed fruit

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron
• 2 Tbsp. cooked chopped vegetable
• 1-2 Tbsp. meat (ground or chopped)
• 2 Tbsp. chopped soft fruit

Snack

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron

• Breastmilk or 6-8 oz. formula with iron