Reports Heart Disease and Stroke in Minnesota 2011 Burden Report

Reports
Heart Disease and Stroke in Minnesota 2011 Burden Report

Heart Disease and Stroke in Minnesota 2011 Burden Report (PDF)

The Heart Disease and Stroke in Minnesota 2011 Burden Report is a surveillance report describing the impact of cardiovascular disease and its major risk factors on Minnesotans. Special emphasis is placed on heart disease and stroke, the two largest categories of cardiovascular disease. This report presents current and recent trends in heart disease and stroke risk factors for Minnesota adults and children, prevalence of heart disease and stroke in Minnesota adults, awareness of the signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke, hospitalizations for heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases, quality of care in clinics and hospitals, and deaths due to heart disease and stroke.

Executive Summary

Chapter 1: Prevalence of Heart Disease, Stroke, and Risk Factors

Approximately 139,000 Minnesotans (3.5% of adults) have coronary heart disease (CHD), and over 90,000 (2.3% of adults) have had a stroke

  • 15.8% of adults do not participate in any leisure time physical activityBurden Report Cover - link to document
  • 16.7% of adults are current cigarette smokers
  • 78.1% of adults consume less than five fruit and vegetable servings per day
  • 6.4% of adults have diabetes
  • 24.9% of adults are obese
  • 21.6% of adults have high blood pressure
  • 33.8% of adults have high cholesterol

Behavioral risk factors for heart disease and stroke are prevalent in school-age children in Minnesota:

  • 19.2% of 12th graders are current cigarette smokers
  • 56.6% of 12th graders do not get adequate physical activity
  • 82.4% of 12th graders consume less than five fruit and vegetable servings per day

Disparities in risk factors appear very early in Minnesota children enrolled in WIC:

  • Rates of overweight and obesity are much higher for American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander and Hispanic children than for white and black children

Chapter 2: Heart Attack and Stroke Symptom Awareness

  • Approximately half of Minnesota adults do not recognize the signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke
  • Most Minnesota adults know to call 9-1-1 as their first action when they suspect someone is having a heart attack or stroke

Chapter 3: Heart Disease and Stroke Hospitalizations

  • In 2009, there were over 72,000 hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease, including more than 50,000 for heart disease and almost 12,000 for stroke, among Minnesota residents
  • Total charges for cardiovascular disease hospitalizations among Minnesota residents topped $2.5 billion in 2009

Chapter 4: Heart Disease and Stroke Quality of Care Measures and Access to Care

  • In 2009, more than one-third of patients visiting Minnesota clinics received optimal vascular care, and almost three-fourths were able to get their blood pressure adequately controlled
  • Minnesota hospitals performed better than the national average on five of twelve key process of care measures for heart disease hospitalizations, but lagged the national average in two others
  • Disparities in rehabilitation care after heart attack or stroke exist, with men more likely than women to receive rehabilitation care after heart attack (19 percentage points higher) and stroke (24 percentage points higher)

Chapter 5: Mortality

  • In 2009, heart disease and stroke were the second and fourth leading causes of death in Minnesota
  • In 2009, there were 37,801 deaths among Minnesota residents – Heart disease accounted for 7,233 (19.1 percent) deaths, and stroke accounted for 2,023 (5.4 percent) deaths
  • Between 2000 and 2009, the overall heart disease mortality (death) rate declined approximately 31 percent
  • Between 2000 and 2009, the overall stroke mortality (death) rate declined approximately 38 percent
  • Minnesota continues to experience lower mortality rates due to heart disease and stroke than the United States as a whole

Racial disparities in heart disease and stroke are a problem in Minnesota:

  • American Indian men have persistently higher heart disease mortality rates than white men (39% higher in the 2005-2009 time period)
  • American Indian women have persistently higher heart disease mortality rates than white women (34% higher in the 2005-2009 time period)
  • Black men have persistently higher stroke mortality rates than white men (23% higher in the 2005-2009 time period)
  • Black women have persistently higher stroke mortality rates than white women (22% higher in the 2005-2009 time period)
  • The gap in stroke mortality rates between American Indians and whites has begun to increase (23% and 22% higher for American Indian men and women in the 2005-2009 time period)
  • The gap in stroke mortality rates between Asians/Pacific Islanders and whites has begun to increase (37% and 30% higher for Asian/Pacific Islander men and women in the 2005-2009 time period)
  • Mortality rates due to heart disease and stroke vary considerably across Minnesota counties
  • Compared to whites and Asians/Pacific Islanders, premature death due to heart disease disproportionately impacts blacks and American Indians in Minnesota
  • Compared to whites, premature death due to stroke disproportionately impacts blacks, American Indians, and Asians/Pacific Islanders in Minnesota