Asthma in the Work Place

There are over 300 substances in the work place that can cause asthma. These substances can be from chemicals, plant matter or animals. Even low levels of exposures to some of these substances can cause asthma. Any irritant at a high enough level can cause more asthma symptoms if you already have asthma.

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Environmental Protection Agency

US Environmental Protection Agency Protection the Health of Nail Salon Workers:

The booklet addresses chemicals found in nail products and their potential health effects. It also recommends best shop practices that nail salon owners and workers should adopt for a better and safer working place.
http://www.health.state.mn.us/asthma/documents/07epanailsalonguide.pdf
(PDF: 1.04MB/21 pages)


Environmental Protection Agency


New Information:
Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation
US Environmental Protection Agency

Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) is one of the fastest growing products in the building and construction industry. While these products can be helpful in conserving energy, it is important that installation of these materials is performed in a safe manner.

The Environmental Protection Agency has recently posted information on how to avoid exposure to these products because they contain isocyanates. Isocyanates are the leading attributable cause of work-related asthma. This new website also provides information on the types of products available, and protection of workers as well as building occupants.

To access this new guidance and information, link to: http://www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/spf/spray_polyurethane_foam.html


National Institure for Occupational Safety and Health

NIOSH Alert for methylenebis (phenyl isocyanate) (MDI)


"Preventing Asthma and Death from MDI Exposure During Spray-on Truck Bed Liner and Related Applications"
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2006-149/

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) issued an August 2006 alert regarding exposure to methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate) (MDI). More than 10,000 U.S. workers are potentially exposed to MDI during spray-on truck bed lining operations. The NIOSH Alert, "Preventing Asthma and Death from MDI Exposure During Spray-on Truck Bed Liner and Related Applications," summarizes four case reports: one death and several incidents of asthma or other respiratory disease following exposure to MDI during spray-on truck bed lining operations. Information about preventing adverse health effects from exposure to MDI is urgently needed by workers, employers, small business owners, and physicians and other health care providers.

Tuesday, December 03, 2013 at 01:20PM