Data for HIAs by Sector

Tracking Network data may be used to inform plans, projects, and policies. Below are examples of where Tracking Network data may be used for HIAs, by sector. This information is not a comprehensive list of HIAs that may be conducted. 

Transportation

Transportation planning and design can:

  • Promote physical activity to reduce obesity and prevent physical injuries, and improve cardiovascular, respiratory, and mental health
  • Reduce air pollution, especially fine particles and ozone.

Major transportation corridors often create higher pollution levels, in areas that include vulnerable populations that may have many health and environmental concerns (e.g., high rates of asthma, poor air quality, and poverty/low incomes).  HIAs can help prevent or reduce additional burdens on these communities.
For transportation-related HIAs, the MN Tracking Program has data available for:

  • Asthma hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits
  • Heart attack hospitalizations
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalizations and ED visits
  • Outdoor air quality measures for ozone and fine particles
  • Population characteristics (poverty, income, health insurance)

These data are available on the Data Access portal.

View additional data at the CDC National Tracking Network and the CDC Transportation HIA Toolkit. Also, learn more about MDH initiatives to promote active living and physical activity, and active transportation.

Land Use

Land use decisions affect how people live and their health.  Communities that are designed to encourage physical activity, such as walking and biking, help promote healthy behaviors. These healthy behaviors reduce obesity and chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.  Land use refers to a broad set of community design and built environment topics, including zoning, access to parks, walkability, and transportation. 
The MN Tracking Program has data on:

  • Outdoor air pollution for ozone and fine particulate matter
  • Population characteristics (poverty, income)
  • Asthma hospitalizations and ED visits
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalizations, ED visits
  • Heart attack hospitalizations
  • Childhood blood lead levels
  • Age of housing

These data are available on the Data Access portal.

View additional data at the CDC National Tracking Network.

Climate Change

Evidence suggests that the world’s climate is becoming warmer. While climate predictions vary by region in the United States, more extreme weather is likely to occur.  In Minnesota, climate change will increase the potential for:

  • More frequent and severe heat waves
  • Increased frequency of harmful algal blooms
  • Flooding as a result of heavy precipitation
  • Additional air pollution (such as ozone and allergens in the air like pollen and mold)

Many local communities are forming action plans to prepare for their adaptation to a changing climate.  Assessing current and projected health effects may help communities estimate how their changing climate, without further adaptation, may affect their health and environment.  To assist with a climate related HIA, the MN Tracking Program has data on:

  • Hospitalizations and ED visits due to heat-related illnesses
  • Asthma hospitalizations, prevalence, and ED visits
  • Ozone
  • Population characteristics (poverty, income, health insurance)

These data are available on the Data Access portal.

View additional data at the CDC National Tracking Network. Also, learn more about how local communities can prepare for extreme heat and other climate effects at the MN Climate and Health website. 


Return to MN Tracking: Health Impact Assessments.
Updated Wednesday, 26-Mar-2014 10:56:24 CDT