Comprehensive Diabetes Care, 2002
Testing for Blood Sugar Control (HbA1c Testing)
Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in Minnesota.  People with diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye disease, circulatory problems, and other complications.  Many of these complications can be prevented through ongoing treatment and monitoring of diabetes.
             
For each Minnesota HMO, the table below shows the percentage of members age 18 to 75 with diabetes who had a test for blood sugar control (hemoglobin A1c test) during 2002, by type of insurance coverage.
             
             
 
Private Insurance
Medicare+ Choice
MN Senior Health Options
Medicaid
General Assistance Medical Care
MinnesotaCare
Blue Plus
90.5%
NA
NA
84.2%
87.3%
88.8%
First Plan
89.7%
NA
NA
88.7%
NR
89.8%
Group Health
89.1%
93.1%
NA
NA
NA
NA
HealthPartners
89.3%
NA
NA
82.0%
86.8%
90.9%
Medica
80.8%
NA
50.4%
76.6%
76.1%
86.1%
Metropolitan
NA
NA
92.8%
82.8%
88.0%
90.8%
PreferredOne
86.6%
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Sioux Valley
89.3%
NR
NA
NA
NA
NA
UCare
NA
91.7%
87.9%
78.6%
85.5%
85.9%
             
NA = Not applicable, no members enrolled in this type of coverage.
NR = Not reported.
             
Results are not adjusted for differences in age, gender, health status, region of residence, or difference in level of insurance coverage of health plan members.  For this reason, caution should be used in making direct comparisons across health plans and/or type of insurance coverage.
 Data source: HMO reports to the Minnesota Department of health for calendar year 2002.

| Hedis Home  | HEP Home | MDH Home  |


You can order HEP  publications by visiting the information clearinghouse page. You can send questions to our staff and also join the HEP mailing list by mailing us at hep@health.state.mn.us. Members of the mailing list receive regular notification of available literature and ordering information by mail.  For other questions about the Health Economics Program, please contact the Minnesota Department of Health's Health Policy & Systems Compliance Division, Health Economics Program at 651-282-6367.


[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Updated Tuesday, 16-Nov-2010 08:51:45 CST