Anaplasmosis Basics - Minnesota Dept. of Health

About Anaplasmosis

On this page:
Transmission
Prevention
Signs and symptoms
Diagnosis
Treatment
History
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Fact sheet

Transmission

  • Anaplasmosis is one of several tickborne diseases in Minnesota.

  • Anaplasmosis is a bacterial disease transmitted to humans by Ixodes scapularis (blacklegged tick or deer tick), the same tick that transmits Lyme disease. The tick must be attached at least 12-24 hours to transmit the bacteria that cause anaplasmosis. Not all ticks carry these bacteria.

Prevention

Signs and symptoms

The signs and symptoms of anaplasmosis may include:
  • Fever
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Chills and shaking

  • Less frequent symptoms of anaplasmosis include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, weight loss, abdominal pain, cough, diarrhea, aching joints and change in mental status.

  • Although people of any age can get anaplasmosis, it tends to be most severe in the aging or immune-compromised. Severe complications can include respiratory failure, renal failure and secondary infections.

Diagnosis

  • If anaplasmosis is suspected, see your doctor immediately. 

  • Early diagnosis and treatment can reduce the time a person is ill and the severity of the disease.

Treatment

  • Anaplasmosis is treated with antibiotics.

History

  • Anaplasmosis was first recognized during 1993 in several patients from Minnesota and western Wisconsin; the disease was known as human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) at that time. It was renamed anaplasmosis in 2003.
  • A related form of ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis is found throughout much of southeastern and south-central United States but is not a common disease in Minnesota at this time, although a small number of cases have been reported. Ehrlichiosis due to E. chaffeensis is carried by a different species of tick, the Lone Star tick, which is most common in southern states.
  • Another related form of ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia muris-like agent was identified in Minnesota and Wisconsin patients in 2009. Since then, low numbers of cases have been reported in both states. Ixodes scapularis (blacklegged tick or deer tick) may carry this disease agent and transmit it to people.
  • CDC Anaplasmosis
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) information about anaplasmosis.

Updated Wednesday, 17-Jan-2018 09:25:26 CST