Blastomycosis Statistics and Maps

Blastomycosis is a fungal infection usually acquired by breathing in the spores of the fungus (Blastomycosis dermatitidis) that grows in moist soils, particularly in wooded areas and along waterways. Blastomycosis occurs most often in people living in the central and southeastern United States, particularly in the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys and the Great Lakes states. In Minnesota, blastomycosis is most common in St. Louis, Itasca, Cass, Beltrami, Washington, and Chisago counties.

In addition to surveillance of cases in humans, the Minnesota Department of Health and the Board of Animal Health are also studying blastomycosis in animals to better define areas in the state where the disease is found. Veterinary cases (mostly dogs) are more numerous than human cases and the location where the pet was exposed can often be more easily identified.

On this page:
Human Cases
Veterinary Cases
Articles
Annual summaries

Human Cases

From 1999-2012, 445 laboratory-confirmed cases of human blastomycosis were reported to MDH. A confirmed case is defined as a Minnesota resident with: a positive urine antigen test and compatible clinical symptoms (or) B. dermatitidis organisms cultured or visualized from tissue or body fluid.

Graphs

Maps

Veterinary Cases

  • Blastomycosis occurs most commonly in dogs; however cats and horses have also been known to become infected.
  • From 1999-2012, 988 laboratory-confirmed cases of veterinary blastomycosis were reported to MDH. A confirmed case is defined as a Minnesota resident animal with: a positive urine or serum antigen test and compatible clinical symptoms (or) B.dermatitidis organisms cultured or visualized from tissue or body fluid.

Graphs

Maps

Articles

  • Blastomycosis
    Minnesota Department of Health, Disease Control Newsletter; June 2003: Volume 31, Number 4.

Annual Summary Statistics

  • Blastomycosis, 2012
    Minnesota Department of Health, Disease Control Newsletter;
    Annual Summary of Communicable Diseases Reported to the Minnesota Department of Health, 2012.

Updated Thursday, May 29, 2014 at 09:21AM