Community-Associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) Basics

CA-MRSA infections lack traditional healthcare-associated risk factors. CA-MRSA can cause the same type of infections as other strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

On this page:
History
Transmission
Common Causes
Fact sheet

History

  • Community-associated (CA) MRSA infections were first recognized in the 1980s.

  • Persons with CA-MRSA infections are typically younger and healthier than persons with healthcare-associated MRSA.

  • CA-MRSA bacteria are usually susceptible to more types of antibiotics than are healthcare-associated strains of MRSA.

Transmission

  • Traditionally, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have been associated with hospitalization or other healthcare-associated risk factors.
  • In recent years physicians and other healthcare providers have observed an increasing number of people with MRSA infections who lack traditional healthcare-associated risk factors. These people appear to have community-associated infections.

Common causes

  • CA-MRSA infections can cause the same type of infections as other strains of staph.

  • Studies conducted in Minnesota have found that CA-MRSA is more likely to cause skin and soft tissue infections and that healthcare-associated MRSA is more likely to be found in sputum or urine.

Fact sheet


Updated Tuesday, November 16, 2010 at 02:47PM