References
Animal Bites and Rabies Risk: A Guide for Health Professionals

For consultation on animal bites and rabies risk in humans:
Minnesota Department of Health
Acute Disease Investigation and Control Section
625 North Robert Street
St. Paul, MN 55155
Telephone: 651-201-5414 or toll free: 1-877-676-5414
24-hour answering service available to healthcare providers,
public health professionals, veterinarians and law enforcement.

For consultation on rabies exposure of animals:
Minnesota Board of Animal Health
625 North Robert Street
St. Paul, MN 55155
Telephone: 651-201-6808

Specimen submissions during regular business hours:
Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (VDL)
1333 Gortner Avenue
St. Paul, Minnesota 55108
Telephone: 612-625-8787; 1-800-605-8787
Fax: 612-624-8707
Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Specimen submissions after hours:
University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center
1365 Gortner Avenue
St. Paul, Minnesota 55108
Telephone: 612-625-1919
Emergency receiving: 612-625-9711

Minnesota Rabies Rules

RABIES PREVENTION AND CONTROL
1721.0570 RABIES POSTEXPOSURE MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES FOR ANIMALS.
Subpart 1. Management of animals exposed to a rabid animal.
A. An animal that is determined by the board to have been exposed to rabies must be managed as
described in items B to D.
B. An animal that is currently vaccinated for rabies must be kept under confinement and observed for
signs of rabies for 45 days and, unless exempted by the board, revaccinated for rabies within three days
of the exposure.
C. An animal for which there is a licensed rabies vaccine, but which has never been vaccinated for rabies,
must be euthanized or quarantined for 180 days.
D. All other animals must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The board may require the exposed
animal to be euthanized, quarantined, or confined for up to 180 days. The board may also require the
animal to be vaccinated for rabies.
Subp. 2. Quarantine procedures. Animals must be quarantined in a manner approved by the board so
as to minimize contact with persons or other animals. Dogs, cats, and ferrets, unless exempted by the
board, must be vaccinated or revaccinated for rabies at the beginning of the quarantine period.
Subp. 3. Release of quarantine on rabies-exposed animals. All animals that are quarantined for rabies
must be inspected by a veterinarian at the end of the quarantine period. Quarantine established on an
animal under this part must not be released until a written report is received by the board from a licensed
veterinarian stating the veterinarian inspected the animal at the end of the quarantine period and
observed no signs of rabies. No dog, cat, or ferret may be released from quarantine unless it is currently
vaccinated for rabies.
Subp. 4. Reporting. Any illness in an animal that is under confinement or quarantine established under
this part must be reported immediately to the board.

1721.0580 MANAGEMENT OF ANIMALS THAT BITE HUMANS.
Subpart 1. Dogs, cats, and ferrets. A dog, cat, or ferret that bites a human must be kept under
confinement and observed for signs suggestive of rabies for ten days, or the animal must be euthanized
and tested for rabies. If requested by the Department of Health, a stray or impounded dog, cat, or ferret
that bites a human may be euthanized and tested for rabies before the required five-day holding period as
specified in part 1721.0520, subpart 10, or in Minnesota Statutes, section 346.47.
Subp. 2. Other animals. An animal other than a dog, cat, or ferret that bites a human must be managed
on a case-by-case basis based on the recommendations of the Department of Health. The animals may
be required to be confined and observed for signs suggestive of rabies. If the Department of Health
requests a rabies test, the animal must be euthanized and tested for rabies.
Subp. 3. Confinement procedures. An animal under confinement for rabies observation must be
restricted in such a way that the animal can always be found and cannot wander away. A dog, cat, or
ferret that is currently vaccinated for rabies may be confined in the home or as directed by local
authorities. A dog, cat, or ferret that is not currently vaccinated for rabies may be required by local
authorities to be confined at a veterinary clinic or other secure location at the owner's expense.
Subp. 4. Reporting and testing. Any illness in an animal that is under confinement and observation for
rabies established under this part must be reported to the Department of Health. If the animal shows
signs suggestive of rabies, it must be euthanized and tested for rabies. An animal that dies or is
euthanized during the confinement period must be tested for rabies.
Subp. 5. Enforcement. Local animal control and law enforcement officials are responsible for
enforcement of this part.

References

  1. Manning, S.E., et al., Human rabies prevention--United States, 2008: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR Recomm Rep, 2008. 57(RR-3): p. 1-28.
  2. Rupprecht, C.E., et al., Use of a reduced (4-dose) vaccine schedule for postexposure prophylaxis to prevent human rabies: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. MMWR Recomm Rep, 2010. 59(RR-2): p.1-9.
  3. Compendium of animal rabies prevention and control, 2011:National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians.JAVMA, 2011. 239(5); p. 609-617.
  4. Rabies. In: Heymann D, ed. Control of Communicable Diseases Manual 19th Edition. Washington DC: American Public Health Association, 2008; 498-508.
  5. Rupprecht, C.E. and R.V. Gibbons, Clinical practice. Prophylaxis against rabies. N Engl J Med, 2004. 351(25): p. 2626-2635.
  6. Minnesota Board of Animal Health Rules: 1721.0540-1721.0580.
  7. College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State Unviersity. RFFIT-Result interpretation-human. Accessed 05/15/2014. www.ksvdl.org/rabies-laboratory.

 

Updated Tuesday, August 12, 2014 at 04:10PM