Active Traveler Monitoring - Minnesota Dept. of Health

Active Traveler Monitoring

3/2016

Minnesota stopped active traveler monitoring January 7, 2016.

All information on this page is in reference to the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa and is not currently in place.

On this page:
Overview
About monitoring
Types of monitoring
Risk categories

Overview of Minnesota's active traveler monitoring

The purpose of active traveler monitoring is for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Minnesota Department of Health (MDH), and local health departments to identify early if symptoms develop ¬†and support people who have traveled to Ebola-affected areas. Monitoring will help protect others from being exposed and make sure the individual gets early treatment, which is important for a patient’s chance of recovery.

  • People being monitored were identified by CDC as having recently traveled to one of the Ebola affected areas.
  • People who do not have symptoms ARE NOT infectious, the goal of monitoring is to identify symptoms early.
  • MDH monitored travelers from the week of October 27, 2014 until January 7, 2016.

  • Active Traveler Monitoring Program Fact Sheet (PDF: 43KB/2 pages)
    Frequently asked questions about MDH's active traveler monitoring program. Updated 5/28/2015

About monitoring:

  • Monitoring takes place for 21 days past the last possible exposure and can occur on a voluntary basis or be required by public health order.
  • Travelers will receive active case management that includes twice daily monitoring for symptoms.
  • Travelers will keep a log of their temperature, activities, and close contacts during the 21 days.

Types of monitoring:

Active monitoring:

  • Travelers being monitored must take their temperature twice daily, watch themselves for symptoms, and immediately tell public health officials if they have a fever or other symptoms. Public health officials are responsible for checking at least once a day to see if travelers have a fever or other symptoms of Ebola.

Direct active monitoring:

  • Public health officials conduct monitoring by directly observing the person. This means that a public health official directly observes the person at least once a day to review symptoms and check their temperature; a second follow-up per day can be done by telephone instead of being directly observed.

Risk categories:

There are four risk categories based on degree of exposure.

Exposure Risk Category Monitoring

High risk includes:

  • Direct contact of infected body fluids through:
    • Needle stick, or splashes to eyes, nose, or mouth
    • Getting body fluids directly on skin
    • Living with and caring for a person showing symptoms of Ebola
  • Handling body fluids, such as in a laboratory, without wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) or following recommended safety precautions
  • Touching a dead body without wearing appropriate PPE in a country with widespread Ebola transmission
    • In countries with widespread Ebola transmission, it is not always known what a person died of. Therefore, touching any dead body in one of these countries is considered a high risk exposure

Direct active monitoring

Some risk includes any of the following:

  • Any direct patient care in a healthcare setting in countries with widespread Ebola transmission
  • Direct contact with a person showing symptoms of Ebola while wearing appropriate PPE in countries with widespread Ebola transmission
  • Close contact with a person showing symptoms of Ebola such as in a household, health care facility, or the community (no PPE worn)
    • Close contact means being within three feet of the person with Ebola for a long time without wearing appropriate PPE

Direct active monitoring

Low (but not zero) risk includes any of the following:

  • Having been in a country with widespread Ebola transmission within the previous 21 days and having no known exposure
  • Being in the same room for a brief period of time (without direct contact) with a person showing symptoms of Ebola
  • Having brief skin contact with a person showing symptoms of Ebola when the person was believed to be not very contagious
  • Direct contact with a person showing symptoms of Ebola or their body fluids while wearing appropriate PPE in countries without widespread Ebola transmission
  • Travel on an airplane with a person showing symptoms of Ebola

Active monitoring for most;
Direct active monitoring for some

No identifiable risk includes:

  • Contact with a person who is not showing symptoms after that person was in contact with a person with Ebola
  • Contact with a person with Ebola before the person was showing symptoms
  • Having traveled to a country with widespread Ebola transmission more than 21 days ago
  • Having remained on or in the immediate vicinity of an aircraft or ship during the entire time it was present and having no direct contact with anyone from the community in a country with widespread Ebola transmission

No monitoring

More about monitoring


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Updated Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 01:37PM