About Invasive Candidiasis (IC) - Minnesota Dept. of Health

About Invasive Candidiasis (IC)

On this page:
About IC
Tracking IC infections
Transmission
People most at risk
More about IC and antimicrobial resistance

About Invasive Candidiasis (IC)

  • Candida is a type of yeast that is normally found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and on the people's skin.
  • In individuals with certain underlying conditions, Candida can cause a serious infection called invasive candidiasis (IC).
  • Most cases of IC are health care-associated infections (HAIs). An estimated 46,000 cases of IC occur each year in the United States.
  • Infections can occur in the bloodstream (an infection called candidemia), heart, brain, eyes, bones, and other deep tissue and organ sites in the body.
  • Candidemia is the most common form of IC and is among the most common types of HAI bloodstream infections.
  • Antifungal medication is required to treat IC.
    • Antifungal resistance in Candida is a growing threat.
    • In 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention described fluconazole-resistant Candida as a serious hazard in its list of antimicrobial resistant threats with the most impact on human health.

Tracking IC infections

  • MDH began conducting surveillance for IC on January 1, 2017 in the 7-county metro area (Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott, and Washington Counties).
  • Surveillance for IC includes only candidemia; other invasive Candida infections are not reportable at this time.

Transmission

  • Most infections of IC occur when Candida normally found on the patient is introduced into a normally sterile site through the disruption of skin or the lining of the GI tract. Some skin or GI disruptions that can be associated with IC include the presence of indwelling invasive devices, abdominal surgeries, and chemotherapy-induced mucosal barrier injury.
  • IC is generally not transmitted person-to-person, but occasionally Candida can be spread via health care workers’ hands or contaminated medical devices. Some species of Candida are more likely than others to be transmitted in this manner.

People most at risk

  • IC most commonly occurs in people who have:
    • Suppressed immune systems
    • Frequent or prolonged stays in health care settings, particularly in intensive care units
    • Invasive medical devices such as intravenous catheters
    • History of taking certain antibiotics for long periods of time
    • Received major abdominal surgery
  • Healthy people usually do not get invasive infections caused by Candida.

More about IC and antimicrobial resistance

Updated Wednesday, 08-Nov-2017 08:22:05 CST