Appendices: Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT) for
Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae:

Guidance for Medical Providers in Minnesota

Developed by: Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) in consultation with: California Department of Public Health Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) Control Branch; New Mexico Department of Health; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who allowed MDH to use their EPT guidances.

Download formatted for print: Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT) for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Guidance for Medical Providers in Minnesota (PDF: 942KB/29 pages)

Appendices

  1. Minnesota Statute 2008 151.37 Legend Drugs, Who May Prescribe, Possess
  2. Directions for Sex Partners of Persons with Chlamydia
  3. Directions for Sex Partners of Persons with Gonorrhea and directions for Sex Partners of Persons with Gonorrhea and Chlamydia
  4. Directions for Sex Partners of Persons with Chlamydia (Spanish)
  5. Directions for Sex Partners of Persons with Gonorrhea and directions for Sex Partners of Persons with Gonorrhea and Chlamydia (Spanish)
  6. Information for Patients
  7. Coaching patients about Partner Notification
  8. EPT References
  9. Acknowledgements

Appendix A: Minnesota Statute 2008
151.37 LEGEND DRUGS, WHO MAY PRESCRIBE, POSSESS.

Applicable Subdivision of the Minnesota Amended Pharmacy Bill on Expedited Partner Therapy:
Subd. 2. Prescribing and filling.
(a) A licensed practitioner in the course of professional practice only, may prescribe, administer, and dispense a legend drug, and may cause the same to be administered by a nurse, a physician assistant, or medical student or resident under the practitioner's direction and supervision, and may cause a person who is an appropriately certified, registered, or licensed healthcare professional to prescribe, dispense, and administer the same within the expressed legal scope of the person's practice as defined in Minnesota Statutes. 

A licensed practitioner may prescribe a legend drug, without reference to a specific patient, by directing a nurse, pursuant to section 148.235, subdivisions 8 and 9, physician assistant, or medical student or resident to adhere to a particular practice guideline or protocol when treating patients whose condition falls within such guideline or protocol, and when such guideline or protocol specifies the circumstances under which the legend drug is to be prescribed and administered.

(f) Nothing in this chapter prohibits a licensed practitioner from issuing a prescription or dispensing a legend drug in accordance with the Expedited Partner Therapy in the Management of Sexually Transmitted Diseases guidance document issued by the United States Centers for Disease Control.

Appendix B: DIRECTIONS FOR SEX PARTNERS OF PERSONS WITH CHLAMYDIA

Download formatted for print: (PDF: 65KB/2 pages)

URGENT and PRIVATE

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR HEALTH

DIRECTIONS FOR SEX PARTNERS OF PERSONS WITH CHLAMYDIA

PLEASE READ THIS VERY CAREFULLY

Your sex partner has recently been treated for chlamydia. Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that you can get from having any kind of sex (oral, vaginal, or anal) with a person who already has it. You may have been exposed. The good news is that it’s easily treated. You are being given a medicine called azithromycin (sometimes known as “Zithromax”) to treat your chlamydia. Your partner may have given you the actual medicine, or a prescription that you can take to a pharmacy. These are instructions for how to take azithromycin.

The best way to take care of this infection is to see your own doctor or clinic provider right away. If you can’t get to a doctor in the next several days, you should take the azithromycin. Even if you decide to take the medicine, it is very important to see a doctor as soon as you can, to get tested for other STDs. People can have more than one STD at the same time. Azithromycin will not cure other sexually transmitted  infections. Having STDs can increase your risk of getting HIV, so make sure to also get an HIV test.

SYMPTOMS
Some people with chlamydia have symptoms, but most do not. Symptoms may include pain in your testicles, pelvis, or lower part of your belly. You may also have pain when you urinate or when having sex. Many people with chlamydia do not know they are infected because they feel fine.

BEFORE TAKING THE MEDICINE
The medicine is very safe.  DO NOT TAKE if any of the following are true:

  1. You are female and are pregnant, or have lower belly pain; pain during sex; vomiting; or fever.
  2. You are male and have pain or swelling in the testicles or fever.
  3. You have ever had a bad reaction, rash, breathing problems, or allergic reaction after taking azithromycin or other antibiotics. People who are allergic to some antibiotics may be allergic to other types. If you do have allergies to antibiotics, you should check with your doctor before taking this medicine.
  4. You have a serious long-term illness, such as kidney, heart, or liver disease.
  5.  If you are currently taking another prescription medication, including medicine for diabetes, consult your pharmacist before taking the medication to ask about drug interactions

If any of these circumstances exist, or if you are not sure, do not take the azithromycin. Instead, you should talk to your doctor as soon as possible. Your doctor will find the best treatment for you.

WARNINGS

  1. If you do not take medicine to cure chlamydia, you can get very sick. If you are a woman, you might not be able to have children.
  2. If you are pregnant, seek medical evaluation before taking the medicines.

HOW TO TAKE THE MEDICINE

  1. You can take these pills with or without food. However, taking these pills with food decreases the likelihood of having an upset stomach and will increase the amount of medicine your body absorbs.
  2. You need to take all the pills you were given to be cured.
  3. Do NOT take antacids (such as Tums, Rolaids, or Maalox) for one hour before or two hours after taking the azithromycin pills.
  4. Do NOT share or give this medication to anyone else.

SIDE EFFECTS
Very few people experience any of these problems.  Possible side effects include:

  1. Slightly upset stomach;
  2. Diarrhea;
  3. Dizziness;
  4. Vaginal yeast infection.

These are well-known side effects and are not serious.

ALLERGIC REACTIONS
Allergic reactions are rare.  If you have ever had a bad reaction, rash, breathing problems or other allergic reactions with azithromycin or other antibiotics, consult your doctor or pharmacy before taking.
Possible serious allergic reactions include:

  1. Difficulty breathing/tightness in the chest;
  2. Closing of your throat;
  3. Swelling of your lips or tongue;
  4. Hives (bumps or welts on your skin that itch intensely).

NEXT STEPS

  1. Now that you have taken your azithromycin, do not have sex for the next seven days. It takes seven days for the medicine to cure chlamydia.
  2. If you have sex without a condom, or with a condom that breaks, during those first seven days, you can still pass on the infection to your sex partners.
  3. If you have any other sex partners, tell them you are getting treated for chlamydia, so they can get treated too.
  4. People who are infected with chlamydia once are very likely to get it again. It is a good idea to get tested for chlamydia and other STDs three months from now to be sure you did not get another infection.

Congratulations on taking good care of yourself! If you have any questions about the medicine, contact your partner’s healthcare provider. For more information about chlamydia or other STDs, or to find STD testing in your area, please call the Minnesota Family Planning and STD Hotline at 1.800.78FACTS (1.800.783.2287 voice/TTY) or visit www.inspot.org/minnesota.

Adapted from Patient-Delivered Partner Therapy for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Guidance for Medical Providers in California, California Department of Public Health Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) Control Branch in collaboration with California STD Controllers Association, March 27, 2007

IDEPC Division, STD, HIV and TB Section
PO Box 64975 St. Paul, MN 55164

Appendix C: DIRECTIONS FOR SEX PARTNERS OF PERSONS WITH GONORRHEA AND DIRECTIONS FOR SEX PARTNERS OF PERSONS WITH GONORRHEA AND CHLAMYDIA

Download formatted for print: (PDF: 68KB/2 pages)

URGENT and PRIVATE

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR HEALTH

DIRECTIONS FOR SEX PARTNERS OF PERSONS
WITH GONORRHEA AND DIRECTIONS FOR SEX PARTNERS OF PERSONS WITH GONORRHEA AND CHLAMYDIA

PLEASE READ THIS VERY CAREFULLY

Your sex partner has recently been diagnosed with one or more sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). This means you may have been exposed to chlamydia and/or gonorrhea. You can get chlamydia and gonorrhea from having any kind of sex (oral, vaginal, or anal) with a person who already has them. The good news is that they are easily treated. You are being given two different types of medicine. To cure gonorrhea you are receiving cefixime (sometimes known as “Suprax”) or cefpodoxime (sometimes known as “Vantin”).  The other is called azithromycin (sometimes known as “Zithromax”). It will cure chlamydia. Your partner may have given you both medicines, or a prescription that you can take to a pharmacy. These instructions are for how to take cefixime, cefpodoxime and azithromycin.

The best way to take care of these infections is to see your own doctor or clinic provider right away. If you can’t get to a doctor in the next several days, and you were given both medications, you should take both. Even if you decide to take the medicines, it is very important to see a doctor as soon as you can to get tested for other STDs that these medications may not cure. Having STDs can increase your risk of getting HIV, so make sure to also get an HIV test.

SYMPTOMS
Some people with chlamydia and gonorrhea have symptoms, but many do not. Symptoms of chlamydia and gonorrhea may include having an unusual discharge from the penis, vagina, or anus. You may also have pain when you urinate, or pain in your groin, testicles, pelvis, or lower belly. Women may experience pain during sex. Many people with chlamydia and gonorrhea do not know they are infected because they feel fine.

BEFORE TAKING THE MEDICINE
The medicines are very safe.  DO NOT TAKE if any of the following are true:

  1. You are female and are pregnant, or have lower belly pain; pain during sex; vomiting; or fever.
  2. You are male and have pain or swelling in the testicles or fever.
  3. You have one or more painful and swollen joints, or a rash all over your body.
  4. You have ever had a bad reaction, rash, breathing problems, or allergic reaction after taking cefpodoxime, cefixime, azithromycin, or other antibiotics. People who are allergic to some antibiotics may be allergic to other types. If you do have allergies to antibiotics, you should check with your doctor before taking these medicines.
  5. You have a serious long-term illness, such as kidney, heart, or liver disease.
  6. You are currently taking another prescription medicine, including medicine for diabetes.
  7. If you are currently taking another prescription medicine, including medicine for diabetes consult your doctor or a pharmacist before taking the medication to ask about drug interactions.

If any of these circumstances exist, or if you are not sure, do not take these medicines. Instead, you should talk to your doctor as soon as possible. Your doctor will find the best treatment for you.

WARNINGS

  1. If you performed oral sex on someone who was infected with gonorrhea, the medicine may not work as well. You need to see a doctor to get stronger medicine.
  2. If you do not take medicine to cure chlamydia or gonorrhea, you can get very sick. If you’re a woman, you might not be able to have children.
  3. If you are pregnant, seek medical evaluation before taking the medicines

HOW TO TAKE THE MEDICINE

  1. Take the medicines with food. This will decrease the chances of having an upset stomach, and will increase the amount your body absorbs.
  2. Take all pills with water at the same time. You need to take all pills in order to be cured.
  3. Do NOT take antacids (such as Tums, Rolaids, or Maalox) for one hour before or two hours after taking the medicines.
  4. Do NOT share or give these medicines to anyone else.

SIDE EFFECTS
Very few people experience any of these problems.  Possible side effects include:

  1. Slightly upset stomach;
  2. Diarrhea;
  3. Dizziness;
  4. Vaginal yeast infection.

These are well-known side effects and are not serious.

ALLERGIC REACTIONS
Allergic reactions are rare.  If you have ever had a bad reaction, rash, breathing problems or other allergic reactions with azithromycin or other antibiotics, consult your doctor or pharmacy before taking.
Possible serious allergic reactions include:

  1. Difficulty breathing/tightness in the chest;
  2. Closing of your throat;
  3. Swelling of your lips or tongue;
  4. Hives (bumps or welts on your skin that itch intensely).

NEXT STEPS

  1. Now that you have your medicines, do not have sex for the next seven days after you have taken the medicines. It takes seven days for the medicines to cure chlamydia and gonorrhea. If you have sex without a condom, or with a condom that breaks, during those first seven days, you can still pass on the infection to your sex partners.
  2. If you have any other sex partners, tell them you are getting treated for chlamydia and gonorrhea, so they can get treated too.
  3. If you think you do have symptoms of a sexually transmitted disease and they do not go away within seven days after taking these medicines, please go to a doctor for more testing and treatment.
  4. People who are infected with chlamydia and gonorrhea once are very likely to get infected again. It is a good idea to get tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea and other STDs three months from now to be sure you did not get another infection.

Congratulations on taking good care of yourself! If you have any questions about the medicine, contact your partner’s healthcare provider. For more information about chlamydia, gonorrhea or other STDs, or to find STD testing in your area, please call the Minnesota Family Planning and STD Hotline at 1.800.78FACTS (1.800.783.2287 voice/TTY) or visit www.inspot.org/minnesota.

Adapted from Patient-Delivered Partner Therapy for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Guidance for Medical Providers in California, California Department of Public Health Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) Control Branch in collaboration with California STD Controllers Association, March 27, 2007

IDEPC Division, STD, HIV and TB Section
PO Box 64975 St. Paul, MN 55164

Appendix D: INSTRUCCIONES PARA PAREJAS SEXUALES DE PERSONAS CON CLAMIDIA

Download formatted for print: (PDF: 30KB/2 pages)

URGENTE Y PRIVADO

INFORMACIÓN IMPORTANTE SOBRE SU SALUD

INSTRUCCIONES PARA PAREJAS SEXUALES DE PERSONAS CON CLAMIDIA

LEA LO SIGUIENTE CON MUCHA ATENCIÓN

Su pareja sexual ha sido tratada recientemente por clamidia.

La clamidia es una enfermedad de transmisión sexual (STD, por sus siglas en inglés) que se puede contraer al tener cualquier tipo de relación sexual (oral, vaginal o anal) con alguien que ya tiene la enfermedad. Es posible que usted haya estado expuesto. Lo bueno es que se puede tratar fácilmente.

Le van a dar un medicamento llamado azitromicina (azithromycin, a veces conocido como “Zithromax”) para tratar la clamidia. Es posible que su pareja le haya dado el medicamento mismo o una receta médica para que lo pueda adquirir en una farmacia. Estas son instrucciones sobre cómo tomar la azitromicina.

Consultar de inmediato con su médico o clínica es la mejor manera de tratar estas infecciones. Si no puede hablar con un médico en los próximos días debe tomar la azitromicina.

Incluso si decide tomar el medicamento es muy importante que vea a un médico lo antes posible para que le hagan la prueba de otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual. Las personas pueden tener más de una enfermedad de transmisión sexual al mismo tiempo. La azitromicina no curará otras infecciones de transmisión sexual. Tener enfermedades de transmisión sexual puede aumentar su riesgo de contraer el VIH, así que asegúrese de hacerse también la prueba del VIH.

SÍNTOMAS
Algunas personas con clamidia tienen síntomas, pero muchas no. Los síntomas podrían incluir dolor en los testículos, en la pelvis o en la parte baja del vientre. También podrían sentir dolor al orinar o al tener relaciones sexuales. Muchas personas con clamidia no saben que están infectadas porque se sienten bien.

ANTES DE TOMAR EL MEDICAMENTO
Lea lo siguiente antes de tomar el medicamento:
El medicamento es muy seguro. Si está tomando otro medicamento recetado, incluyendo medicamentos para la diabetes, consulte a su medico o farmacéutico antes de tomar el medicamento para preguntar sobre interacciones con otras drogas. NO LO TOME si alguna de las siguientes cosas es cierta:

  • Es mujer y está embarazada o tiene dolor en la parte baja del vientre, dolor al tener relaciones sexuales, vómitos o fiebre.
  • Es hombre y tiene dolor o hinchazón en los testículos o fiebre.
  • Alguna vez tuvo una mala reacción, sarpullido, problemas para respirar o una reacción alérgica después de tomar la azitromicina u otros antibióticos. Las personas que son alérgicas a algunos antibióticos pueden ser alérgicas a otros tipos. Si es alérgico a los antibióticos hable con su médico antes de tomar este medicamento.
  • Tiene una enfermedad seria a largo plazo, como una enfermedad de los riñones, el corazón o el hígado.

Si existe cualquiera de estas circunstancias, o si no está seguro, no tome la azitromicina. En lugar de tomarla debe hablar con su médico lo antes posible. Su médico encontrará el mejor tratamiento para usted.

ADVERTENCIAS

  • Si no toma el medicamento para curar la clamidia usted se puede enfermar muy gravemente. Si es mujer, la clamidia puede hacer que no pueda tener hijos.
  • Si está embarazada se debe hacer un chequeo médico antes de tomar los medicamentos.

CÓMO TOMAR EL MEDICAMENTO

  • Puede tomar estas pastillas con o sin comida. Tomar el medicamento con comida hace que sea menos probable que tenga malestar estomacal y aumentará la cantidad de medicamento que absorbe el cuerpo.
  • Para curarse tiene que tomar todas las pastillas.
  • NO tome antiácidos (como Tums, Rolaids o Maalox) una hora antes o dos horas después de haber tomado las pastillas de azitromicina.
  • NO comparta este medicamento con nadie ni tampoco se lo dé a nadie.

EFECTOS SECUNDARIOS
Muy pocas personas experiementan cualquiera de estos problemas. Posibles efectos adversos incluyen: 

  • un poco de malestar estomacal,
  • diarrea,
  • mareos,
  • infección vaginal por levaduras.

Estos son efectos secundarios bien conocidos y no son serios.

REACCIONES ALÉRGICAS
Las reacciones alérgicas son poco frecuentes. Si alguna vez has tenido una mala reacción, erupción cutánea, problemas respiratorios u otras reacciones alérgicas con azitromicina u otros antibióticos, consulte a su médico o farmacéutico antes de tomar.
Posibles reacciones alérgicas muy serias incluyen:

  • dificultad para respirar o sentir el pecho apretado,
  • cierre de la garganta,
  • hinchazón de los labios o de la lengua,
  • urticaria (bultos o verdugones en la piel que pican mucho).

LO QUE DEBE HACER DESPUÉS

  • Ahora que ha tomado la azitromicina, no tenga relaciones sexuales por siete días. El medicamento tarda siete días en curar la clamidia.
  • Si durante esos primeros siete días tiene relaciones sexuales sin condones, o con un condón que se rompe, puede pasar la infección a sus parejas sexuales.
  • Si tiene otras parejas sexuales dígales que lo están tratando por clamidia para que también reciban tratamiento.
  • Las personas que estuvieron infectadas por clamidia una vez tienen una gran probabilidad de volver a infectarse.
  • Conviene que en los próximos tres meses se haga la prueba de la clamidia y de otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual para estar seguro de que no tiene ninguna otra infección.

¡Felicidades por cuidarse tan bien! Si tiene alguna duda sobre el medicamento, comuniquese con el médico de su pareja. Para obtener más información sobre la clamidia u otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual, o para localizar donde hacen pruebas de enfermedades de transmisión sexual en su localidad, por favor llame  a la línea directa de Planificación Familiar y Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual de Minnesota (Minnesota Family Planning and STD Hotline) 1-800-783-FACTS (1.800.783.2287 Voz/sistema TTY) o visite www.inspot.org/minnesota.

Adaptado de Terapia de Compañero Entregada por Paciente para Chlamydia trachomatis y Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Direcciones para Proveedores Médicos en California, Departamento de Salud Pública Rama de Control de Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual (ETS) en colaboración con la Asociación de Reguladores de ETS de California, Marzo 27, 2007

IDEPC Division, STD, HIV and TB Section
PO Box 64975 St. Paul, MN 55164

Appendix E: INSTRUCCIONES PARA PAREJAS SEXUALES DE PERSONAS CON GONORREA INSTRUCCIONES PARA PAREJAS SEXUALES DE PERSONAS CON GONORREA Y CLAMIDIA

Download formatted for print: (PDF: 70KB/2 pages)

URGENTE Y PRIVADO

INFORMACIÓN IMPORTANTE SOBRE SU SALUD

INSTRUCCIONES PARA PAREJAS SEXUALES DE PERSONAS CON GONORREA

INSTRUCCIONES PARA PAREJAS SEXUALES DE PERSONAS CON

GONORREA Y CLAMIDIA

LEA LO SIGUIENTE CON MUCHA ATENCIÓN

Su pareja sexual ha sido diagnosticada recientemente con una o más enfermedades de transmisión sexual (STD, por sus siglas en inglés). Esto quiere decir que usted puede haber estado expuesto a la clamidia y/o a la gonorrea.

Usted puede contraer la clamidia y/o la gonorrea al tener cualquier tipo de relaciones sexuales (orales, vaginales o anales) con alguien que ya tiene las enfermedades. Lo bueno es que se pueden tratar fácilmente.

Le van a dar dos medicamentos diferentes. Para curar la gonorrea esta recibiendo cefixima (cefixime, a veces conocido como “Suprax”) o cefpodoxima (cefpodoxime, a veces conocido como “Vantin”). El otro se llama azitromicina (azithromycin, a veces conocido como “Zithromax”) y cura la clamidia. Es posible que su pareja le haya dado los dos medicamentos o una receta médica para que los pueda adquirir en una farmacia. Estas son instrucciones sobre cómo tomar la cefixima, cefpodoxima y la azitromicina.

Consultar de inmediato con su médico o clínica es la mejor manera de tratar estas infecciones. Si no puede hablar con un médico en los próximos días, y le fueron dados los dos medicamentos, debe tomarse los dos medicamentos.

Incluso si decide tomar los medicamentos es muy importante que vea a un médico lo antes posible para que le hagan la prueba de otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual que estos medicamentos no curan.
Tener enfermedades de transmisión sexual puede aumentar su riesgo de contraer el VIH, así que asegúrese de hacerse también la prueba del VIH.

SÍNTOMAS
Algunas personas con clamidia y gonorrea tienen síntomas, pero muchas otras no. Los síntomas de clamidia y gonorrea podrían incluir tener una secreción inusual del pene, la vagina o el ano. También podrían sentir dolor al orinar o dolor en la ingle, los testículos, la pelvis o la parte baja del vientre. Las mujeres podrían sentir dolor al tener relaciones sexuales.
Muchas personas con clamidia y no saben que están infectadas porque se sienten bien.

ANTES DE TOMAR LOS MEDICAMENTOS
Lea lo siguiente antes de tomar el medicamento:
El medicamento es muy seguro. Si está tomando otro medicamento recetado, incluyendo medicamentos para la diabetes, consulte a su medico o farmacéutico antes de tomar el medicamento para preguntar sobre interacciones con otras drogas. NO LO TOME si alguna de las siguientes cosas es cierta:

  • Es mujer y está embarazada o tiene dolor en la parte baja del vientre, dolor al tener relaciones sexuales, vómitos o fiebre.
  • Es hombre y tiene dolor o hinchazón en los testículos o fiebre.
  • Siente dolor y tiene hinchazón en una o más articulaciones o sarpullido en todo el cuerpo.
  • Alguna vez tuvo una mala reacción, sarpullido, problemas para respirar o una reacción alérgica después de tomar la cefixima, cefpodoxima, azitromicina u otros antibióticos.  Las personas que son alérgicas a algunos antibióticos pueden ser alérgicas a otros tipos.  Si es alérgico a los antibióticos hable con su médico antes de tomar estos medicamentos.
  • Tiene una enfermedad seria a largo plazo, como una enfermedad de los riñones, el corazón o el hígado. Si existe cualquiera de estas circunstancias, o si no está seguro, no tome estos medicamentos.

En lugar de tomarlos debe hablar con su médico lo antes posible. Su médico encontrará el mejor tratamiento para usted.

ADVERTENCIAS

  • Si tuvo relaciones sexuales orales con alguien que estaba infectado por gonorrea es posible que el medicamento no tenga los efectos deseados. Debe hablar con su médico para que le recete un medicamento más fuerte.
  • Si no toma el medicamento para curar la clamidia o la gonorrea usted se puede enfermar muy gravemente. Si es mujer, la gonorrea puede hacer que no pueda tener hijos.
  • Si está embarazada se debe hacer un chequeo médico antes de tomar los medicamentos.

CÓMO TOMAR LOS MEDICAMENTOS

  • Tome los medicamentos con comida. Esto hace que sea menos probable que tenga malestar estomacal y aumentará la cantidad de medicamento que absorbe el cuerpo.
  • Tome todas las pastillas con agua al mismo tiempo. Para curarse tiene que tomar todas las pastillas.
  • NO tome antiácidos (como Tums, Rolaids o Maalox) una hora antes de tomar los medicamentos o hasta después de dos horas de haberlos tomado
  • NO comparta estos medicamentos con nadie ni tampoco se los dé a nadie.

EFECTOS SECUNDARIOS
Muy pocas personas experiementan cualquiera de estos problemas. Posibles efectos adversos incluyen:

  • un poco de malestar estomacal,
  • diarrea,
  • mareos
  • infección vaginal por levaduras.

Estos son efectos secundarios bien conocidos y no son serios.

REACCIONES ALÉRGICAS
Las reacciones alérgicas son poco frecuentes. Si alguna vez has tenido una mala reacción, erupción cutánea, problemas respiratorios u otras reacciones alérgicas con azitromicina u otros antibióticos, consulte a su médico o farmacéutico antes de tomar.

Posibles reacciones alérgicas muy serias incluyen:

  • dificultad para respirar o sentir el pecho apretado,
  • cierre de la garganta,
  • hinchazón de los labios o de la lengua,
  • urticaria (bultos o verdugones en la piel que pican mucho).

LO QUE DEBE HACER DESPUÉS

  • Ahora que tiene los medicamentos, no tenga relaciones sexuales por siete días después de tomarlos. Los medicamentos tardan siete días en curar la clamidia y la gonorrea. Si durante esos primeros siete días tiene relaciones sexuales sin condones, o con un condón que se rompe, puede pasar la infección a sus parejas sexuales.
  • Si tiene otras parejas sexuales dígales que lo están tratando por clamidia y gonorrea para que también reciban tratamiento.
  • Si le parece que tiene síntomas de una enfermedad de transmisión sexual y no se le quitan dentro de los siete días de haber tomado estos medicamentos vaya a un médico para que le hagan más pruebas y le den más tratamiento.
  • Las personas que estuvieron infectadas por clamidia y gonorrea una vez tienen una gran probabilidad de volver a infectarse.
  • Conviene que en los próximos tres meses se haga la prueba de la clamidia, de la gonorrea y de otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual para estar seguro de que no tiene ninguna otra infección.

¡Felicidades por cuidarse tan bien! Si tiene alguna duda sobre el medicamento, comuniquese con el médico de su pareja. Para obtener más información sobre la clamidia, gonorrea u otras enfermedades de transmisión sexual, o para localizar donde hacen pruebas de enfermedades de transmisión sexual en su localidad, por favor llame a la línea directa de Planificación Familiar y Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual de Minnesota (Minnesota Family Planning and STD Hotline) 1-800-783-FACTS (1.800.783.2287 Voz/sistema TTY) o visite www.inspot.org/minnesota.

Adaptado de Terapia de Compañero Entregada por Paciente para Chlamydia trachomatis y Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Direcciones para Proveedores Médicos en California, Departamento de Salud Pública Rama de Control de Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual (ETS) en colaboración con la Asociación de Reguladores de ETS de California, Marzo 27, 2007

IDEPC Division, STD, HIV and TB Section
PO Box 64975 St. Paul, MN 55164

Appendix  F: COACHING PATIENTS ABOUT PARTNER NOTIFICATION

Download formatted for print: (PDF: 16KB/1 page)

Patients may experience anger, embarrassment, fear, and discomfort upon learning that they have an STD. This may be exacerbated when they realize they need to disclose this information to partners and see that they receive treatment. To help patients better understand the importance of partner treatment, providers can discuss the following:

  • If the partner does not receive treatment, and they have sex again, there is a great likelihood that the patient will become reinfected.
  • If people are unaware they have the infection and/or do not get treated, they can develop serious health complications.
  • If a partner does not get treated, he/she can spread the infection to other partners, now or in the future.

Providers can coach their patients on the most successful ways to initiate this difficult conversation. Whenever possible, offer patients the opportunity to talk through how to best approach their partners before leaving the exam room when the option of EPT has been decided.

There are additional key messages that should be conveyed to patients and their partner(s) when EPT is prescribed:

  • Partners should read the informational material very carefully before taking the medication.
  • Partners who have allergies to antibiotics or who have serious health problems should not take the medications and should see a healthcare provider.
  • Partners should seek a complete STD evaluation as soon as possible, regardless of whether they take the medication.
  • Partners who have symptoms of a more serious infection (e.g., pelvic pain in women, testicular pain in men, fever in women or men) should not take the EPT medications and should seek care as soon as possible.
  • Partners who are or could be pregnant should seek care as soon as possible.
  • Patients and partners should abstain from sex for at least seven days after treatment and until seven days after all partners have been treated, in order to decrease the risk of recurrent infection.
  • Partners should be advised to seek clinical services for re-testing three months after treatment.

Appendix G

EPT RESOURCES

RED DOOR CLINIC
525 Portland Avenue South, Minneapolis MN
612-543-5555
www.reddoorclinic.org
The Red Door Clinic, a part of Hennepin County Community Health Department, provides diagnosis and treatment of STDs and pregnancy prevention services.

ROOM 111 (Ramsey County Public Health)
555 Cedar Street, St. Paul MN
 651-266-1352
The Room 111 Clinic, a part of Ramsey County Department of Public Health, provides diagnosis and treatment of STDs.

PLANNED PARENTHOOD
www.plannedparenthood.org
Planned Parenthood has health centers all over the country, including 22 in Minnesota. Each center offers high quality sexual and reproductive health care, gynecological care, family planning, STI/STD testing and treatment and abortion services.

MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/dtopics/stds/index.html
The STD webpage offers STD resources including information about sexually transmitted diseases.

www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/dtopics/stds/partnerservices.html
The Partner Services Program offers partner notification services.

www.health.state.mn.us/youth/
The adolescent health webpage provides information for providers, parents and others to promote healthy adolescence.

MINNESOTA FAMILY PLANNING AND STD HOTLINE
www.sexualhealthmn.org/
A toll-free hotline for confidential information about the prevention, testing locations and treatment of STDs in Minnesota.
1-800-78-FACTS (1-800-783-2287 voice/TTY)

inSPOT MINNESOTA
www.inspot.org/minnesota
A peer-to-peer, Web-based, STD Partner notification system.

Content Notice: This site contains HIV or STD prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all audiences. Since HIV and other STDs are spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics. If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please exit this web site.

Updated Thursday, August 07, 2014 at 10:02AM