Minnesota Immunization Rule Revision
Summary of Proposed School and Child Care Immunization Law Changes

The following is a list of proposed changes to the school and child care immunization law that MDH is considering. The department's primary objective is to update Minnesota's immunization requirements to reflect current, evidence-based national immunization recommendations.

  • Require that schools submit their Annual Immunization Status Report (AISR) directly to MDH. Current law states that each school must submit an AISR to the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE), who then in turn forwards it to MDH. However, in current practice, the report is a web-based application managed by MDH. Changing this part of the law would formalize an efficiency made possible by technology that wasn’t available when the law was written. (Note: The AISR only contains aggregate school immunization information.)
  • Require that child care submit their Child Care Report directly to MDH. Current law states that each child care must submit an AISR to the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), who then in turn forwards it to MDH. However, in current practice, the report is sent directly to MDH. (Note: This report only contains aggregate child care immunization information.)
  • Include all school-based early childhood programs that meet at least once a week for six weeks or more in the school and child care immunization law. Currently, only Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) and certain child care settings are included in the law.
  • Change the age for the first varicella (chickenpox) immunization from 18 months to 15 months for children enrolling in child care and school-based early childhood programs to match current medically acceptable standards*. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that the first dose of varicella be given at 15 months.
  • Clarify the documentation requirement for history of varicella (chickenpox) disease. The intent of the 2004 law was that only persons who had varicella disease in 2010 or later must have provider documentation of disease. Persons who had varicella disease prior to 2010 are only required to supply the month and year when they had varicella disease.
  • Change the timing of the polio vaccine to match current medically acceptable standards*. The ACIP recommends that the last dose of polio vaccine be given on or after a child's fourth birthday; the current law does not reflect that.
  • Change the timing of the DTaP vaccine to match current medically acceptable standards*. The ACIP recommends that the last dose of DTaP vaccine be given on or after a child's fourth birthday; the current law does not reflect that.
  • Require documentation of hepatitis B, varicella (chickenpox), and MMR vaccines or a legal exemption in all grades - kindergarten through 12th grade. Current law only requires documentation at kindergarten and 7th grade for these vaccines. This change will give schools the authority to verify that a child is immunized or has taken a medical or conscientious exemption, regardless of grade. (Note: MDH is not proposing a change in the AISR reporting requirement for these vaccines. Reporting to MDH will still only be at kindergarten and 7th grade.)
  • Require hepatitis B vaccination for a child enrolling in child care or a school-based early childhood program according to medically acceptable standards* unless the parent/guardian takes a medical or conscientious exemption. This proposed change corresponds to current medically acceptable standards*.
  • Replace the current 7th grade Td requirement with a Tdap requirement. Legal exemptions from the vaccination would not change. This proposed change corresponds to current medically acceptable standards*.
  • Require a child enrolling in a secondary school to have a meningococcal vaccination beginning in 7th grade according to medically acceptable standards unless the parent/guardian takes a medical or conscientious exemption for the vaccine. This proposed change corresponds to current medically acceptable standards*.
  • Require hepatitis A vaccination for a child enrolling in child care or a school-based early childhood program according to medically acceptable standards, unless the parent or guardian takes a medical or conscientious exemption applies. The ACIP recommends routine hepatitis A vaccination at 12 months, with catch-up after 24 months for those who are at high risk of hepatitis A infection or for whom protection is otherwise desired.

*The term “medically acceptable standard” refers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) immunization recommendations. See Federal Recommendations vs. Law for a comparison of Minnesota’s current school immunization law to ACIP’s immunization recommendations.

Updated Thursday, 25-Apr-2013 11:26:00 CDT