Contents:

FALL 2010

farmers market in st paul  

DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

photo of Mark Schoenbaum
Mark Schoenbaum

GET READY FOR PAYMENT REFORM

Major reforms are in motion to better align payment for health care services with actual health outcomes. In Minnesota, payments are now available to certified health care homes. Further quality incentives, such as baskets of care and provider peer grouping are on the horizon. Payment changes in the federal health reform law will roll out nationally over the next decade. Health insurance exchanges, accountable care organizations, value based purchasing, bundled payments and Medicaid expansions are expected to alter the financial landscape for every provider and facility.

Read the rest of the story.

Mark Schoenbaum is director of the Office of Rural Health and Primary Care and can be reached at mark.schoenbaum@state.mn.us or 651-201-3859.

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PARTNER FOCUS


HEALTHY MOMS—HEALTHY BABIES

by Cheryl Fogarty, P.H.N., M.P.H. Infant Mortality Consultant, Minnesota Department of Health-Maternal and Child Health

The death of an infant in the first year of life has a profound impact on families and communities and is an indicator of the health and well-being of a population. Averaging fewer than five infant deaths per 1,000 live births annually, Minnesota has one of the lowest infant mortality rates in the country—but not among all populations. Disparities greater than two-fold exist among American Indians and African Americans. Eliminating this disparity has been elusive. Read the rest of the story

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COMMUNITY FOCUS

 
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TWIN CITY HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TRAIN FOR HEALTH CARE JOBS

In 2005, the Augsburg Fairview Academy began preparing Twin Cities high school students for careers in health care. The charter public school in Minneapolis helps students from disenfranchised communities explore health careers and other caring vocations, receive training and certification and go on to college. Students gain work experience in professional settings, earn early college credits while still in high school, and 90 percent of graduates go on to college. The idea for the school arose from its cosponsors: Augsburg College was committed to creating accessibility for traditionally underserved urban students and Fairview Health Service’s goal was to give more youth a first-hand view of vocations in health care. Read the rest of the story.

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SPECIAL FEATURE

TELEMENTAL HEALTH: CAN IT WORK FOR RURAL MINNESOTA?

Five years ago the Rural Health Advisory Committee (RHAC) studied and reported on Mental Health and Primary Care in Rural Minnesota. The committee examined national health care trends, surveyed rural primary care clinic providers on mental/behavioral health issues, examined Critical Access Hospital mental/behavioral health emergency room visits, and highlighted examples of promising practices for provider education and care delivery.

Acknowledging that rural mental health access depends not only upon a strong primary care foundation, but also requires a variety of innovative models of delivery, the Rural Health Advisory Committee decided to take a deeper look at another important tool—telemedicine. Read the rest of the story.

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View online all previous issues of the Office of Rural Health and Primary Care publications.


 

 


Minnesota Office of Rural Health and Primary Care
P. O. Box 64882
St. Paul, Minnesota 55164-0882
Phone 651-201-3838
Toll free in Minnesota 800-366-5424
Fax: 651-201-3830
TDD: 651-201-5797
www.health.state.mn.us/divs/orhpc

  MISSION: To promote access to quality health care for rural and underserved urban Minnesotans. From our unique position within state government, we work as partners with communities, providers, policymakers and other organizations. Together, we develop innovative approaches and tailor our tools and resources to the diverse populations we serve