Contents:

WINTER 2012

rabbit  

DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

photo of Mark Schoenbaum
Mark Schoenbaum

IT WAS 20 YEARS AGO

In 1992, the Minnesota Legislature considered major health reform legislation that would create the MinnesotaCare coverage program when passed. Among the concerns voiced during that session were doubts there would be an adequate health care workforce and misgivings that a wave of anticipated consolidations would harm rural communities’ access to care. Worried the law would end the ability of rural health leaders to have a say in these major changes, rural legislators insisted that to earn their support, the law must be responsive to rural needs and characteristics.

On a parallel track, both state and federal leaders were recognizing that state leadership was needed to improve primary care services for underserved urban communities.

The intersection of these trends created the Office of Rural Health and Primary Care in 1992. Its mission: to promote access to quality healthcare for rural and underserved urban Minnesotans.

Read the rest of the story.

Mark Schoenbaum is director of the Office of Rural Health and Primary Care and can be reached at mark.schoenbaum@state.mn.us or 651-201-3859.

top of page

PARTNER FOCUS


MINNESOTA'S FIRST SENIOR-FOCUSED COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER

Tucked away in a corner of north Minneapolis is a kind of oasis for seniors. Surrounded by landscaped green space, the new Heritage Park Senior Campus offers assisted living, memory care and an elegant community center that brings together a range of elder-tailored health and wellness services, including a “boutique” YMCA open only to those 55 years and older, an indoor walking path and one of the state’s few therapy pools.

This summer, a Community Health Center (CHC) joined the mix, with the new Heritage Seniors Clinic. Read the rest of the story.

top of page

PROGRAM FOCUS


BRINGING PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY TRAINING TO RURAL MINNESOTA

Trauma cases involving children are infrequent -- in 2009, they accounted for less than 6 percent of all ambulance runs statewide, according to Minnesota State Ambulance Reporting (MNSTAR) data. Yet when they do occur, the results are often tragic. Trauma is the leading cause of death among pediatric patients in the state.

Children’s cases are often stressful and challenging for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. Not only is it difficult to see a child suffer, but such cases call for unique skills and techniques specific to children -- knowledge that can be difficult to retain when it is put to use so infrequently. In rural areas, where low-population density often means low-volume EMS calls, providers can go for months or even years without seeing pediatric trauma incidents. Yet when those traumas do occur, the children are at increased risk of disability and death compared to their urban counterparts, largely because of longer transport times.

Read the rest of the story.

top of page

SPECIAL FEATURE


TAKING A STEP TOWARD BETTER HEALTH

by Amber Dallman and Chera L. Sevcik

A hot, 95-degree day did not stop 25 citizens and community leaders from attending a walkability and bikeability workshop in St. James on Tuesday, September 11. The workshop, facilitated by the Minnesota Department of Health, provided communities in Watonwan County with information on how street and community design is essential to increasing physical activity levels and improving the health of their community. Read the rest of the story.

top of page

RHAC MEMBER PROFILE


ORHPC TALKS WITH RURAL HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE (RHAC) MEMBER NANCY STRATMAN

Please explain your professional work to us . . .

I’m a licensed nursing home administrator working as the CEO/Administrator at the senior campus of Cokato Charitable Trust in Cokato, which is about an hour west of the Twin Cities. The campus consists of a 56-bed skilled facility, 46 units of assisted living, a 10-bed dementia unit, a Medicare-certified Home Health agency, home-delivered meals, child day care and adult day care. We serve a total of about 225 people in the community and employ about 180 staff.

I am also a board member for Aging Services of MN and the Aging Services Group, a member of the state’s Diabetes Steering Committee and chair-elect of Care Ventures Cooperative. On RHAC, I am the Long-Term Care Representative. Read the rest of the story.

top of page

View online all previous issues of the Office of Rural Health and Primary Care publications.


 

 


Minnesota Office of Rural Health and Primary Care
P. O. Box 64882
St. Paul, Minnesota 55164-0882
Phone 651-201-3838
Toll free in Minnesota 800-366-5424
Fax: 651-201-3830
TDD: 651-201-5797
www.health.state.mn.us/divs/orhpc

  MISSION: To promote access to quality health care for rural and underserved urban Minnesotans. From our unique position within state government, we work as partners with communities, providers, policymakers and other organizations. Together, we develop innovative approaches and tailor our tools and resources to the diverse populations we serve.