The Emerging Leaders Network ended in 2011. These pages are no longer updated, but are online for archival purposes.

ELN Video Transcripts

Jump To: Join the ELN | Support the ELN


Join the Emerging Leaders Network

Transcript

[Music]

Narrator: The Emerging Leaders Network of Minnesota (the ELN) is a year-long leadership training program for professionals in all sectors of the public health field. It was founded in 2002 by an energized, visionary group of public health leaders from many types of organizations, which all strive to keep all Minnesotans healthy. Through retreats, team-building exercises, networking, coaching and mentoring, and learning programs, the program teaches collaborative leadership skills to individuals at all stages of their careers.

Key goals of the program are to: Increase diversity among Minnesota's public health professionals, build leadership networks across public, private, and non-profit sectors, [and] enhance skills and competence using collaborative leadership principles.

Sakawdin Mohamed, Budget/Data Analyst, ELN Cohort Member: I always had interest about public health; that's why I—It had started years, years [ago], when living in the refugee camps, that I felt public health was really, really important.

Liliana Tobon, Public Health Practitioner, ELN Cohort Member: I think what was really appealing to me about the program was the fact that they were trying to develop new leaders that represent diversity, you know, the diversity that Minnesota has right now.

Mohamed: Within our group, we have physicians, people from different backgrounds, from different ethnicities, from different professional levels.

Tobon: [Ethnicity], and race, and country of origin, gender, sexual orientation—you name it. And I just love that. I love the fact that I have been able to learn so much from all the people, see so much passion they bring, and at the same time, everybody being so unique in the way that we all are in this group, we can find common ground, and that really moves me. I think it is the most beautiful part for me of being part of ELN.

Barry Taylor, Chiropractor, ELN Cohort Member: You know, the biggest change in my career path since participating in the ELN is that now it's my career path, rather than something that's just happening to me.

Mohamed: Leadership is communicating with others—communicating, whether it is with your colleagues, your superiors…

Tobon: I didn't have an idea before about having any leadership skills, and this has helped me to recognize that, indeed, I have them; that I have been using them in the past without realizing it.

Taylor: You know, now, when I'm in a planning meeting, I'm the first to put my hand up, because I recognize where I fit in, in the project.

Mohamed: The skills that you learn, whether it is the listening, or leading, or whether it is the coaching skills, or dialogue skills, or conflict management skills, really, really help you, and help every profession, whether you're a nurse, doctor, or a data analyst—anyone that's really working in the public health field.

Tobon: I have heard so many times during this training the importance of listening, and listening with attention, and listening with curiosity.

Shana Sniffen, Physician, ELN Cohort Member: I realized how rare it is that we really get to hear each other's stories, and people from all over the world, with really different backgrounds—to really be able to hear those stories was really powerful.

Taylor: During the ELN retreats, you really get that time for self-reflection, and it was during a retreat that I realized how important it is to look at my strengths, rather than just at my weaknesses and limitations.

Sniffen: Taking the time to fully understand who you are and be grounded so that, as we are making choices, we can make them with a sense of intent and purpose, and realizing by taking the time to do that—it makes me a better person, physician, and leader.

Mohamed: Leadership is communicating with others—communicating, whether it is with your colleagues, your superiors… We had dialogue and coaching sessions, skills and techniques that we learned how to talk to your colleagues, or [eliminate] conflict within groups.

Tobon: It really helps you to see other perspectives, and open your mind to new ways of thinking.

Taylor: The ELN and the format that it does with the retreats, it allows you to take that time away, and to really think through, you know, who you are, and what your vision is. It's that opportunity to make sure that your work aligns with your personal vision.

[Music]

Support the Emerging Leaders Network

Transcript

[Music]

Narrator: The Emerging Leaders Network of Minnesota (the ELN) is a year-long leadership training program for professionals in all sectors of the public health field. It was founded in 2002 by an energized, visionary group of public health leaders from many types of organizations, which all strive to keep all Minnesotans healthy. Through retreats, team-building exercises, networking, coaching and mentoring, and learning programs, the program teaches collaborative leadership skills to individuals at all stages of their careers.

Key goals of the program are to: Increase diversity among Minnesota's public health professionals, build leadership networks across public, private, and non-profit sectors, [and] enhance skills and competence using collaborative leadership principles.

Tricia Todd, ELN Cofounder: Probably five to seven years ago, a number of public health leaders were sitting around the table, talking about the future of public health. And they were talking about the demographic changes, and how a number of the leaders that presently were in public health were going to be retiring, and taking that wisdom, and that experience, and that knowledge with them. And, when they left, the question that everyone kept coming up with was: "Who's going to be our leaders?"

Barry Taylor, Chiropractor, ELN Cohort Member: The great thing about the ELN is that it captures future leaders before they're necessarily in a leadership role, and [in] that way it really acknowledges and nurtures this idea of leadership potential.

Liliana Tobon, Public Health Practitioner, ELN Cohort Member: I didn't have an idea before about having any leadership skills, and this has helped me to recognize that, indeed, I have them; that I have been using them in the past without realizing it.

Todd: The Emerging Leaders Network was named intentionally; it was going to focus on emerging leaders, and we wanted to build a network of leaders, because we recognized how important it was for the number of people that were going to need to take on leadership responsibilities to know people in a variety of different professions. So we weren't looking at strictly public health governmental leaders; we were looking for public health leaders in nonprofits, public health leaders in health care systems.

Shana Sniffen, Physician, ELN Cohort Member: I've been able to connect with some of the folks at the public health department through the ELN people that I've met, to bring a collaboration with the clinic that I work in, which is in an underserved community, with the public health department, that has identified specific health problems and classes that they would like to offer. And so, together, we've been able to do a community event, and our clinic will be hosting one of the classes sponsored by the public health department, and our patients were really excited about this event, and we're excited to continue building on this collaboration that we've started.

Todd: The financial support of the ELN is used to support the program and to support the faculty, so that we get [really] high-quality faculty. It's to support the materials, and the staff time, and all of that background stuff that goes into making sure a program runs effectively. But it's also used to create scholarships for those people that perhaps don't have the financial means—their organizations and/or themselves—to take part in the program.

Tobon: What was really appealing to me about the program was the fact that they were trying to develop new leaders that represent diversity, you know, the diversity that Minnesota has right now. And for me, as a person of color, when I started working here, I was looking for leaders that looked like me, or people that had some experiences working with communities of color, and it was very hard to find.

Sakawdin Mohamed, Budget/Data Analyst, ELN Cohort Member: Within our group, we have physicians, people from different backgrounds, from different ethnicities, from different professional levels.

Tobon: [Ethnicity], and race, and country of origin, gender, sexual orientation—you name it. And I just love that. I love the fact that I have been able to learn so much from all the people, [and] see so much passion.

Todd: It's a long-term investment. We're not investing in something that's going to see results in six months. You're investing in something that will see results in two years, in five years, in 10 years.

Sniffen: What a great opportunity to meet a variety of people from really diverse, unique backgrounds, who also all share a common passion for the betterment of society, and health, and how it brings out a sense of hope because there's so many people from so many different areas really, truly wanting to work together, and truly wanting to make things better.

Todd: We need leaders that have the confidence to get out there and be vulnerable, because the issues that we face in public health make lots of us vulnerable. And our leaders have to be so strong, and so willing to face the challenges, and sometimes say things that other people aren't willing to say, and sometimes people are afraid to hear. And that kind of leadership doesn't just happen. It needs nurturing, and the ELN is the kind of program that can nurture people to really take on those tough leadership issues and do it effectively.

[Music]