Injury and Violence Prevention News

August 2005
In this issue:
1. Child maltreatment in Minnesota: data brief and news release
2. September 9: Child and Adolescent Violence Prevention Summit on in Minnesota
3. Project promotes the health of people with disabilities
4. Fitting bike helmets and living with traumatic brain injury: Spanish translations now available
5. Some true and false questions about injury and violence
6. Back-to-school safety recommendations
7. Teens Behind the Wheel curriculum
8. Buckle Up Teens Grants Available
9. September suicide prevention observances

1. Child maltreatment in Minnesota: data brief and news release

Child Maltreatment Violence Data Brief, 2001-2002, a new report from the Minnesota Department of Health provides insight into child maltreatment in Minnesota by reviewing data both from Minnesota’s hospitals and from child protective services (CPS) agencies. CPS reports identified more than 11,500 incidents involving more than 10,000 children. These include neglect as well as physical abuse. Hospitals and their emergency departments identified more than 600 incidents of injuries resulting from physical abuse, involving 503 children. Young children were at highest risk, and birth, step-, and foster parents were the most frequent abusers. The news release offers a summary of the report.



Top of Page

2. September 9: Child and Adolescent Violence Prevention Summit on in Minnesota

The Minnesota Department of Health's Injury and Violence Prevention Unit is convening a half-day summit to discuss the current state and future direction of child and adolescent violence prevention in Minnesota. Cordelia Anderson of Sensibilities, Inc will be facilitating this first major step toward creating a strategic plan. Primary focus areas include policy development, prevention programming and data collection. It will be vital to hear from as many voices as possible as this project gets underway. If you have questions or are interested in attending, please contact Maureen Holmes, (651) 281-9871 or at . Lunch will be provided and mileage expense from outside the Twin Cities will be reimbursed.

Child and Adolescent Violence Prevention Summit
Friday, September 9, 2005
Noon to 4:30 p.m.
Black Bear Crossing, Como Pavilion, St. Paul



Top of Page

3. Project promotes the health of people with disabilities

Promoting the health of people with disabilities is the goal of the new Minnesota Disability Health Project, which is coordinated by the Minnesota Department of Health's Injury and Violence Prevention Unit and funded by a CDC planning grant. The project also seeks to prevent secondary health conditions that often are experienced by people with disabilities. An advisory work group represents a variety of agencies and organizations that work with people with disabilities. Minnesota is one of 16 state grantees, and CDC has also funded related research projects as well as programs of three national organizations.

If you have resources or contacts to offer or want to be involved in another manner, please contact Evelyn Anderson (651) 281-9870.



Top of Page

4. Fitting bike helmets and living with traumatic brain injury: Spanish translations now available

Two pieces produced by the Injury and Violence Prevention Unit are now available in Spanish as well as English. The materials may be downloaded and printed on color copiers.

In addition, printed copies of the English versions of both pieces are available at no cost. Please contact Doug Palmer, (651) 281-9857



Top of Page

5. Some true and false questions about injury and violence

These questions will be used at the MDH State Fair booth and can be used for county fairs or other public awareness programs.

True or false:

Falls send more elderly people to the hospital than any other injury.
True - Most elderly people fall at home because they trip on something, often a rug.

You should wear a bike helmet every time you get on a bike, even if it's for a short distance.
True - Wearing a bicycle helmet reduces the risk of brain injury by 85 percent.

The youngest children - those from age 1 to 4 - are the most likely to drown.
True - Make sure an adult is watching kids around water, every minute!

Firearms kill one Minnesotan every day.
True - If you have guns, keep them locked and unloaded.

When there's a fire in your house, the first thing you should do is try to put it out.
False - You should get out of the house.

Wars have killed more Americans than motor vehicle crashes.
False - The reverse is true. Wear seatbelts - every body, every seat, every time.

Men can be victims of domestic violence.
True - Anyone can be a victim, and anyone can be a perpetrator.

One in every six women has experienced rape sometime in her life.
True - For prevention ideas, see the Minnesota Department of Health, Sexual Violence Prevention Resource Kit.

Three times as many Minnesotans die from suicide as from homicide.
True - And the leading cause of suicide is depression, which is a treatable medical condition.

Youth are three times more likely to be victims of assault than are adults.
True - A supportive family and strong school and community programs can reduce youth violence.



Top of Page

6. Back-to-school safety recommendations

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has a Neighborhood Safety Network that provides practical prevention tips. Back-to-school safety tips focus on these products:

  • Bicycle Helmets: 56 percent of last year’s nearly 535,000 bicycle-related injuries involved children. About 800 people, including about 200 children, died in a recent year in bicycle-related incidents. Make sure children always wear a bicycle helmet when riding a bike or scooter, and use other appropriate safety gear such as elbow pads and knee pads. Look for a label or sticker on the helmet indicating it meets the CPSC standard.
  • Playgrounds: Each year, more than 200,000 children are taken to hospital emergency rooms due to playground-related injuries. Most injuries occur when a child falls onto the playground surface. Check with your child’s school to make sure there is at least nine inches of safe, shock-absorbing surface material, consisting of wood chips, mulch, sand, pea gravel, or mats made of safety-tested rubber or fiber material. Make sure there is no exposed hardware to catch clothing and no free-hanging ropes attached to the equipment.
  • Soccer Goals: Movable soccer goals can fall over and kill or injure children who climb on them or hang from the crossbar. Make sure soccer goals are securely anchored when in use. Never allow children to climb on the soccer net or goal framework. When not in use, anchor goals or chain them to a nearby fence post or sturdy framework.
  • Art Supplies: CPSC has recalled a variety of art materials over the years due to sharp tools; accessible lead in crayons, chalk and paint; and other hazards. For elementary school age children, only buy art materials that do not contain any hazard warnings and are labeled, “Conforms to ASTM D-4236.”


Top of Page

7. Teens Behind the Wheel curriculum

A new curriculum, Teens Behind the Wheel, was produced by the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety; the AAA Minnesota/Iowa; and the Minnesota Safety Council, with support from the Minnesota Wireless Foundation. The Leader’s Guide includes lesson plans focusing on:

  • not wearing seatbelts
  • having distractions including cell phone use
  • driving with other teens
  • speeding
  • not checking other traffic
  • fatigue

The packet also includes a video with public service announcements. View or order a copy of the packet, free to all Minnesota educators, at the Office of Traffic Safety.



Top of Page

8. Buckle Up Teens Grants Available

Grants of up to $8,500 for programs to increase seat belt usage among teen drivers are available from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety's, Office of Traffic Safety (OTS).The application deadline is September 30, 2005, and the grant period is from November 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006. Applicants may include governmental entities and nonprofit agencies. Grant activities must take place at least three area high schools, with a community partner for each school, must involve parents, and must receive commitment from local law enforcement.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teenagers in Minnesota. Of those killed, only 32.8 percent were wearing their seat belts.

Details and applications are available from OTS or by contacting Gordy Pehrson, (651) 297-4515. The funds come from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and are subject to federal and state guidelines.



Top of Page

9. September suicide prevention observances

September 4 - 10
Suicide Prevention Week

American Association of Suicidology
Information and Media Kit (PDF)
E-mail

September 10
STOP a Suicide, Today!

Screening For Mental Health
E-mail



Top of Page

Also see > National Center for Injury Prevention & Control (NCIPC), at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for the latest injury prevention news at the national-level.


mdh logo
Injury and Violence Prevention Unit
Minnesota Department of Health
PO BOX 64882
ST PAUL MN 55164-0882
(651) 201-5484
injury.prevention@health.state.mn.us

Top of Page

The Minnesota Department of Health attempts to report all data accurately. If you discover an error, please contact us at Injury.Prevention@health.state.mn.us.
By using this system, you agree to not share these data in ways that would identify individuals or provide information on any malicious acts.