Injury and Violence Prevention News

January 2007
In this issue:
1. 1998-2005 Discharge Data Available on MIDAS
2. Men Can Make a Difference Conference Held
3. Colorful New Publications Help Older Adults Prevent Falls
4. What is ACE and Why Does It Matter?

1. 1998-2005 Discharge Data Available on MIDAS

Do you want to know what is happening in your county in unintentional injury and violence? Or, are you interested in the statewide impact of a particular type of injury? Injury and Violence Prevention's, Minnesota Injury Data Access System (MIDAS) has those data for you.

MIDAS enables users to analyze data to meet their specific needs. The newly updated 1998-2005 data represent about 95 percent of all hospital and emergency department discharge data for injuries in Minnesota. You can learn about a specific county, type of injury, timeframe, or intent (unintentional, intentional, or self-inflicted). You also can query data by type of care, outcome (discharge to another program or to home), or gender. Age-adjusted rates are available to make comparisons across counties that have different age distributions. The data set contains no personal identifiers.

MDH uses the data to analyze injury and violence trends and to make policy recommendations.



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2. Men Can Make a Difference Conference Held

On October 13-14, men from across Minnesota gathered at Cragun’s Resort in Brainerd to demonstrate their interest in ending sexual violence. The first-ever Men Can Make a Difference was part of a statewide effort to engage men in prevention. Conference planners included the Minnesota Department of Health, the Gender Violence Institute, and Men as Peacemakers, with co-sponsorship from the Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition, the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault, and the MN Coalition for Battered Women.

Purpose of the conference was to advance the Minnesota Men’s Action Network, an alliance of 500 men working to build environments of sexual integrity and respect, to prevent sexual violence. Participants learned how to prevent sexual violence and develop communities in which relationships are safe, healthy, and mutually respectful.

Keynote speakers were Jackson Katz and Tony Porter.



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3. Colorful New Publications Help Older Adults Prevent Falls

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in partnership with the CDC Foundation and MetLife Foundation, has produced four posters and redesigned two of its popular brochures to help older adults—and those who care for them—prevent falls and the injuries and deaths that result. These materials – falls among older adults – are important resources to protect the health and independence of older adults.

  • What YOU Can Do to Prevent Falls: outlines four key fall prevention strategies: exercising regularly, having medicines reviewed, having yearly eye exams, and reducing fall hazards in the home.
  • Four posters, designed for use in health care facilities, senior centers, and other community organizations, carry the same messages.
  • Check for Safety: A Home Fall Prevention Checklist for Older Adults: guides readers in a room-by-room check of their home to find and fix hazards that can increase the risk of falling.

The materials are available in English, Spanish, and Chinese.



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4. What is ACE and Why Does It Matter?

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) studies show the lifetime effects of harsh childhood experiences such as abuse, neglect, and loss of birth parent(s). Many studies have shown their impact on health and other issues in adulthood. A new publication, The Ace Reporter provides updates on the research.

ACEs are surprisingly common; they happen even in “the best of families;” and they have long-term, damaging consequences. For deeper insight into the definition, frequency, presence, and consequences of Adverse Childhood Experiences, ACE-related publications are available.



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Also see > National Center for Injury Prevention & Control (NCIPC), at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for the latest injury prevention news at the national-level.


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Injury and Violence Prevention Unit
Minnesota Department of Health
PO BOX 64882
ST PAUL MN 55164-0882
(651) 201-5484
injury.prevention@health.state.mn.us

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The Minnesota Department of Health attempts to report all data accurately. If you discover an error, please contact us at Injury.Prevention@health.state.mn.us.
By using this system, you agree to not share these data in ways that would identify individuals or provide information on any malicious acts.