Injury and Violence Prevention News

June 2003
In this issue:
1. Sexual Violence Data Brief: 1999 to 2001
2. Injury and violence epidemic: News from the national Safety in Numbers conference
3. World Health Organization report puts injuries in perspective
4. New crash data linkage shows cost effectiveness of prevention
5. Think ahead to fireworks injury prevention
6. Summer Safety Tips

1. Sexual Violence Data Brief: 1999 to 2001

The Sexual Violence Data Brief summarizes Minnesota information from hospitals, criminal justice agencies, and community surveys. The hospital data reflect the number of patients who, because of sexual violence, received emergency-department care and were released as well as those who were hospitalized. The data brief includes individual county and statewide data. A few highlights:

  • About 96 percent of hospital patients were treated in emergency departments (ED) then released (MDH data does not include those seen in clinics).
  • The average hospital charge of a sexual violence patient was $5,235, and $452 when ED-treated.
  • The primary payer was commercial health insurance and governmental insurance other than Medicaid or Medicare.
  • More than 90 percent of the victims were under age 40.
  • Nearly all the sexual violence hospital patients were female and nearly all the perpetrators were male.


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2. Injury and violence epidemic: News from the national Safety in Numbers conference

Reporting on the April 28-30 CDC Conference, Safety in Numbers, MSNBC said injuries and violence have reached "epidemic levels" and "pose a threat to the nation's economic and social well-being." Feel free to pass the news item along in your communications in the coming months.

Also from the Safety in Numbers conference, Webcasts of:

  • The opening plenary panel featuring US Surgeon General Dr. Richard Carmona; CDC Director Dr. Julie L. Gerberding; National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Administrator Dr. Jeffrey W. Runge; and American Public Health Association Executive Director Dr. Georges C. Benjamin, and
  • The closing plenary presentation by Erika Harold, 2003 Miss America, who chose youth violence as her yearlong theme. You may want to share her comments with youth.


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3. World Health Organization report puts injuries in perspective

Did you know that motor vehicle crashes are deadlier than wars, and more people die from suicide than are murdered? This recent report from the World Health Organization puts the huge burden of injuries into perspective.



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4. New crash data linkage shows cost effectiveness of prevention

The Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System (CODES), a joint effort project to link MDH hospital injury data with the Department of Public Safety (DPS) motor vehicle crash data, has issued its first report. The CODES mission is to determine the cost effectiveness of safety measures and initiatives in Minnesota.

Especially important to prevention efforts, the data shows the effect of safety belt use on hospital charges. The data are for 1998 through 2001.



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5. Think ahead to fireworks injury prevention

In 2001, 34 Minnesotans were injured by fireworks. Twenty-four of them were under age 18, including 6 who were under age 10. June is Fireworks Safety Month, sponsored by Prevent Blindness America, and a good time to plan injury prevention for the Fourth of July! Some resources that may be helpful include:



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6. Summer Safety Tips

View Summer Safety Tips for children, from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Topics include car, water, scooter, and bicycle safety.

 



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Also see > National Center for Injury Prevention & Control (NCIPC), at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for the latest injury prevention news at the national-level.


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Injury and Violence Prevention Unit
Minnesota Department of Health
PO BOX 64882
ST PAUL MN 55164-0882
(651) 201-5484
injury.prevention@health.state.mn.us

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The Minnesota Department of Health attempts to report all data accurately. If you discover an error, please contact us at Injury.Prevention@health.state.mn.us.
By using this system, you agree to not share these data in ways that would identify individuals or provide information on any malicious acts.