Sexual Violence Prevention E-News

October 16, 2009
(View/save as PDF)
In this issue:
1. Sexual Violence Prevention Network Meeting, November 6, 2009
2. Breaking Free’s 7th Annual Candle Light Vigil, October 27, 2009 (note date correction)
3. Star Tribune article about Breaking Free
4. New Report on Sex Trafficking of American Indians: Shattered Hearts: the commercial sexual exploitation of American Indian women and girls in Minnesota
5. Prevention Perspectives from Latin America, Asia and Africa
6. How to use Facebook causes to promote your nonprofit group
7. Two job announcements from the Division of Indian Work
8. Funding Alert
9. NSVRC Funding Opportunities
10. Calendar

1. Sexual Violence Prevention Network Meeting, November 6, 2009

Please come to the next meeting of the:
Sexual Violence Prevention Network
A quarterly gathering to support information sharing, networking and collaboration

Co-hosted by: the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault; the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Justice Programs; and the Minnesota Department of Health, Sexual Violence Prevention Program

Friday, November 6, 2009, 9:50 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Location:
Snelling Office Park
1645 Energy Park Drive, St. Paul, MN. Directions:
http://www.health.state.mn.us/about/sop.html#location

Lunch will be provided (no charge) however,
Registration is Required (by Wednesday, November 4, 2009),
contact amy.kenzie@state.mn.us

Please note: requests for special accommodations must be made by Tuesday, October 27, 2009.  Please provide name, telephone number and type of accommodation needed to amy.kenzie@state.mn.us

Special thanks to the Rape and Sexual Abuse Center http://www.neighborhoodinvolve.org/  
for co-hosting our November SVPN meeting!
(If you are interested in co-hosting a future SVPN meeting, contact amy.kenzie@state.mn.us )

Topic:
Promoting Health and Healing: Addressing the Mental Health Impacts of Sexual Assault from an Advocacy Perspective

Sexual assault and abuse can have serious mental health consequences for women and children.  Understanding the range of potential mental health needs of survivors and how to address them within an empowerment-based framework is an important part of providing services for survivors that enhance their safety and wellbeing.

This presentation will provide an overview of current research on mental health, violence, and abuse and will offer steps that advocates and other professionals can take within their agencies and organizations to address mental health issues in sensitive, appropriate, and empowering ways.

Presenter:
Phyllis Brashler, Ph.D.
Minnesota Department of Health Suicide Prevention Coordinator

Agenda:

9:50 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. - Registration
10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. - Welcome, Introductions
10:30 a.m. – 10:45 – Prevention Overview
10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. – Presentation
12:15 p.m. - 12:45 - Lunch and small group discussions
12:45 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. – Prevention Action Activities
1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. – Resource Sharing, Networking, Wrap up and Evaluations

***(Please be sure to bring resources to announce/share)***
Anyone interested in or working in the field of sexual violence prevention is
WELCOME TO ATTEND.

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2. Breaking Free’s 7th Annual Candle Light Vigil, October 27, 2009 (note date correction)

Breaking Free presents:
7th Annual Candle Light Vigil
Tuesday, October 27, 2009, 6:00 PM
770 University Ave., St. Paul, MN

Breaking Free would like to invite everyone to join us at our 7th Annual event to end prostitution as we remember the many women and girls who have been killed while involved in prostitution and to make a statement in the community that prostitution is violence against all women and girls.

This event will begin promptly at 6:00 p.m. After a brief introduction, we will all join in a short walk down University Ave (known as a high trafficked prostitution area) peacefully protesting (in cooperation with the St. Paul Police) the violence of prostitution.  We will return to 770 University Avenue and begin our presentations and candle light vigil remembering all those of whom we love and who have been killed while involved in prostitution.

We will also remember Sergeant Jerry Vick for the work he had done in trying to eradicate prostitution as a Peace Officer in a kind and respectful way. He will never be forgotten. We will be joined by guest speakers.

Violence against prostituted women and girls has gone unrecognized for many years by minimizing the harm associated with it. Prostituted individuals have been treated as “throw away people” and have been left trapped in their misery without a voice. Everyone in our community is somehow impacted by this vicious cycle.

PLEASE JOIN US AS WE MAKE THIS POWERFUL STATEMENT:
“IT’S NOT OK TO BUY, SELL OR TRADE WOMEN OR GIRLS AT ANY PRICE”

For more information call (Joy) @ 651-645-6557  http://www.breakingfree.net/

HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!!!!  Refreshments will be served after the program.

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3. Star Tribune article about Breaking Free

By PAT PHEIFER • ppheifer@startribune.com
(Link here for the video: http://www.startribune.com/video/63895352.html )

It’s still more than an hour before dawn when Joy Friedman, a Breaking Free staff member, and two volunteers start walking east on E. Lake Street in Minneapolis to do outreach work. There aren’t many vehicles on the streets at 5 o'clock on a Sunday morning, so it’s pretty easy to spot the men circling the block once, twice, three times or more, trolling for sex for sale. But it’s the “janes,” not the “johns,” whom Friedman and the volunteers seek. To the women and girls, some as young as 14, they offer free condoms, a hygiene packet with soap, deodorant and lotion, and maybe, just maybe, for an opening to tell them they can escape prostitution.

St. Paul-based Breaking Free, one of the few organizations of its kind in the Twin Cities, is struggling financially. In the coming weeks, it will take a hard look at its programs to see which can survive. A permanent housing program that houses three single women and 10 families on St. Paul’s East Side is the most likely to change or to close. It is partly supported by a federal grant.

“People need to know that women have to have housing to get out of that life,” said Vednita Carter, executive director of Breaking Free. “Without it they die. We feel that if a woman has to live with a pimp, she’s homeless, or if she has to live with her tricks because she doesn’t have anywhere else to be in the winter. Those things are chronic homelessness to us.”

Breaking Free, which works with about 400 women a year, gets most of its money from private foundation grants and state and federal funding. But funding has been shrinking as foundations, hit by the recession, reevaluate their priorities. Two years ago, Breaking Free’s annual budget was almost $800,000. This year it’s closer to $500,000. Carter said it needs about $1 million to continue to offer all of its services. Paid staff has been cut from five to three; about 25 volunteers take up the slack.
 
According to the Department of Justice, the average age at which girls enter prostitution in the United States is 13. Seventy-five to 80 percent of prostituted women were sexually abused before age 18, according to a 2004 study. When girls run from what’s happening at home, they often run into the clutches of a pimp. “A pimp would never call himself a pimp,” Carter said. “He calls himself a 'boyfriend.’”

Eventually that “boyfriend” will ask for a favor. His friends — oftentimes gang associates — give him money. In exchange, he gives them his girl. “Can you imagine how you feel inside, having sex with people you don’t want to have sex with?” Friedman said. “But you love this guy so much that you don’t want to lose him, so you’ll do it for him. All it takes is one time, and your self-esteem and self-worth go so low to the pits of hell that there’s no returning for the majority of our women.”

St. Paul police Cmdr. Kathy Wuorinen, who heads the narcotics and vice unit, said officers try to do a couple of undercover prostitution sweeps each week to pick up johns and janes. Arrests have gone up in the past two years from what they were in 2006-07, she said. At that time, police averaged about 100 arrests a year; in 2008-09, it’s about 125 per year. She said that with the increased use of the Internet, street prostitution has become “less visible to a degree,” but citizen- and officer-generated complaints are pretty steady, about 225 a year. Minneapolis police Lt. Dean Christiansen, head of the Third Precinct’s Community Response Team, said his officers work on prostitution-related calls almost daily. Jane sweeps require less manpower, but officers try to do undercover john sweeps as well.

The city of St. Paul posts website photos of people convicted of engaging in prostitution or soliciting a prostituted woman. On the city of Minneapolis' website, it's just the men. Both police departments work with Breaking Free and other agencies to try to help the women. Breaking Free works with women in all venues of prostitution — on the street, off the Internet, in escort services or international women being trafficked for sex work. It offers a 12-week support group and aftercare; life skills classes; 18- to 24-month transitional housing that currently houses seven women, and “john school,” a daylong court-ordered seminar in which men convicted of soliciting prostitution hear from survivors, health workers and law enforcers.

Breaking Free measures its success in baby steps. “Success is if we get a phone call, if she comes to group, if she even shows up,” Friedman said. “We can’t force them to get out, but we let them know that when they’re ready, we’re here. Even though she’s going back to [her pimp] every time she leaves our group, she’s looking at him differently now and … saying this isn’t OK, he’s lying to me. But she has to figure a way out.”

Friedman is one of the success stories. Now 46, she’s been out of the life for more than nine years. “I entered prostitution at the age of 13. I was raped by a pimp and three guys at age 15. I can’t blame it on my home life,” she said. “I wasn’t sexually assaulted by a family member. If you’ve been talked down to, told you’re going to be nothing but a whore, that kind of stuff sticks with you. For the next 27 years, in one form or another I was caught up in prostitution, from dancing to call services to streetwalking. “I should be clinically insane because of what I endured,” she said. “But I’m sitting here talking to you because someone helped me address that issue and made me understand that it wasn’t my fault.”

On a recent Sunday morning, Friedman led the volunteers on E. Lake Street. “Walk and talk, ladies, walk and talk,” she told them, reminding them to be aware of potential dangers lurking in dark corners. “Hey, sista’, you need some free condoms,” she said as a woman walked by. Another, maybe 20, broke into a grin and held her plastic sack open for a hygiene packet and condoms when she saw Friedman, a familiar face to the women on the street. After driving down E. Franklin Avenue, Friedman and the volunteers found a woman bawling. “I hate him,” she screamed. Then, in the next breath, “It ain’t him. It’s me. It’s my life.” “It’s OK, it’s all right. We’re not here to judge you,” Friedman said. “You can get out.” A few minutes later and a few blocks away, the woman was seen again, approaching a group of young men.

For more information about Breaking Free link to: http://www.breakingfree.net/

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4. New Report on Sex Trafficking of American Indians: Shattered Hearts: the commercial sexual exploitation of American Indian women and girls in Minnesota

 (Minneapolis, MN, September 22, 2009 –) A groundbreaking report released today by the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center (MIWRC) of Minneapolis, MN highlights the alarming and pervasive sex trafficking of American Indian women and girls in Minnesota. The report entitled Shattered Hearts: the commercial sexual exploitation of American Indian women and girls in Minnesota is the first comprehensive report of its kind and the numbers are shocking.

 “There really hasn’t been a report or this kind of data available before now,” says Suzanne Koepplinger, Executive Director of the Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center (MIWRC). “We have had no comprehensive data that substantiates what we know to be a growing problem in the American Indian community – the sex trafficking of American Indian women and girls right here in Minnesota.”

The report, conducted by Alexandra Pierce, Ph.D., an American Indian research scientist formerly of Wilder Research in St. Paul, MN and funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, was initiated after the MIWRC began tracking unusually high incidences of sexual exploitation of American Indian women and girls coming into the center. The data is a combination of direct interview of MIWRC intake clients, pre-existing data, and Canadian data.

Summary of Key Findings and Facts:

Disproportionate Risk Factors

26 percent of 9th grade and 27 percent of 12th grade Native girls had run away from home in the past 12 months.

21 percent of 12th grade Native American girls reported being sexually assaulted by a date.

28 percent of 6th grade Native girls reportedly have been threatened at school during the past 12 months.

Even Higher Incidence of Encounters with Commercialized Sexual Exploitation

From interviews with MIWRC intake clients, 40 percent of intakes reported some involvement in commercial sexual exploitation and 27 percent reported activities defined as sex trafficking under Minnesota law.

25 percent of those reporting involvement with prostitution and pornography indicated they had exchanged sex for shelter.

22 percent were asked to recruit or pimp other girls.

Nearly 18 percent reported they had been trafficked for financial gain or for drugs or alcohol.

63 percent were first trafficked into sexual exploitation as juveniles, with 21 percent reporting first exploitation between ages 8 - 12.

Over half reportedly were trafficked by “friends”.

The report highlights risk factors for victims that include poverty, a disproportionate number of American Indian homeless, high incidences of overall sexual assault, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) and pervasive multi-generational trauma.

“This is an epidemic,” says Koepplinger. “There are identifiable risk and vulnerability indicators, and very real victims that can be helped. We also must hold sexual perpetrators accountable for their crimes. “We believe the release of the summary report on the sex trafficking of American Indian women and girls will be incredibly helpful to policy makers, legislators, law enforcement, funders, and the overall community,” adds Koepplinger. “We want the report to help all stakeholders forge a strategic direction to deal with this egregious human rights issue.”

Koepplinger suggests next steps to combat the issue include securing government grants and private sector funding, and challenging the systemic response to sex trafficking.  Additional funds would enable the raising of public awareness, education and training of law enforcement representatives and the continued building of a coalition and legislative process to fight the root causes of the issue.

For more information or to access the full report, go to http://www.miwrc.org or contact Suzanne Koepplinger at skoepplinger@miwrc.org

About MIWRC (www.miwrc.org)

MIWRC is a 25 year-old social service non-profit that has been providing direct service and empowering resources to hundreds of American Indian families per year so that they can achieve a better quality of life.  These services address the multiple quality of life issues that constituents present, including homelessness, poverty, addictions, domestic and sexual violence, and need for family and children’s services.

For the past two years, MIWRC has been collaborating with the Division of Indian Work, Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition, and the Minneapolis Police Department to address the sexual exploitation of young Native women and children. Operating on a continuum of direct service, community awareness, and policy advocacy, the partners seek to provide a safety net for vulnerable women and children, and hold perpetrators accountable.

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5. Prevention Perspectives from Latin America, Asia and Africa

Based on experiences from Latin America, Asia and Africa, the presenters share promising practices for engaging men, boys, women and girls in overcoming and preventing sexual violence.

Link to CALCASA (California Coalition Against Sexual Assault):
http://calcasa.org/prevention/prevention-perspectives-from-latin-america-asia-and-africa/ for the archived presentation, recorded on April 15, 2009 at Men Can Stop Rapes conference.

Men and Women as Allies National Conference on the Primary Prevention of Men’s Violence Against Women:
http://mencanstoprape.org/conference/.

Presenters:  Doctor Gary Barker, Senior Technical Advisor for Gender, Violence and Rights at the International Center for Research on Women; and Ritu Sharma, Founder and Executive Director of Women Thrive Worldwide; and Awraris Alemayehu Birkie, Program Officer of the Population Council. Based on experiences from Latin America, Asia and Africa, the presenters share promising practices for engaging men, boys, women and girls in overcoming and preventing sexual violence.

http://www.preventconnect.org/display/displayDocumentItems.cfm?itemID=251

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6. How to use Facebook causes to promote your nonprofit group

Facebook Causes, a tool created to let people develop their own charitable projects and campaigns on the popular social networking site Facebook, has become a useful tool for many nonprofit groups that want to raise money and reach out to potential supporters, especially young people, online.

But fund raising isn't the only reason to use Causes. How might the tool be used to simply attract people to a nonprofit organization's Web site where they can find out how to volunteer, donate, or just learn more about a charity? How should nonprofit leaders use Causes to talk about their charity's mission? How does one get started using the Causes tool? What's the difference between a cause and a nonprofit profile?

Link to the archived transcript from the Chronicle of Philanthropy http://philanthropy.com/live/2009/10/facebook/

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7. Two job announcements from the Division of Indian Work

POSITION: VICTIMS SERVICES COORDINATOR

This is a full-time non-exempt position at the Division of Indian Work. The coordinator will coordinate getting victims of sex exploitation/sexual assault connected to traditional American Indian counseling/Spiritual Healers.

QUALIFICATIONS:
Four-year degree in Social Work or equivalent field + 3 years experience in Program Coordination.
Knowledge of the needs of American Indian parents and families.
Experience, competence, and sensitivity in working with people of different races and cultures.
Effective communication skills, including writing ability.
Effective organizational skills.
Must be a team player and be able to work collaboratively.
Must be flexible in varied working situations.
Must have a valid MN driver's license and a car for work.

RESPONSIBILITIES:
Coordinate the operation of the project including scheduling and arranging bi-monthly visits by Spiritual Healers. Coordinate the organizations activities related to services to victims of crime. Data collection; maintain an up to date filing system, and complete reports in a timely manner. Must be flexible and willing to take on additional tasks as instructed by the Program Director. Related Activities: Staff meetings, team meetings, etc.

DEADLINE:  UNTIL FILLED, SALARY: DOQ


POSITION: PROGRAM ASSISTANT

This is a part-time non-exempt position at the Division of Indian Work.  The Program Assistant will provide administrative support to the Program Director and the Counseling & Faith Based Services for Crime Victims in Indian Country Project. 

QUALIFICATIONS:
Four-year degree in Human Services or related field +1 year experience.
Knowledge of the needs of American Indian parents and families.
Experience, competence, and sensitivity in working with people of different races and cultures.
Effective communication skills, including strong writing and editing abilities.
Must be computer literate.
Effective organizational skills.
Must be a team player and be able to work collaboratively.
Must be flexible in varied working situations.
Must be available to work occasional evenings.
Must have a valid MN driver's license and a car for work.

RESPONSIBILITIES:
Work with Program Director and SFC staff to coordinate and write annual and quarterly grant reports.  Data collection; collect and maintain up-to-date program data for reporting purposes. Must be flexible and willing to take on additional tasks as instructed by the Program Director. Related Activities: Staff meetings, team meetings, etc.

DEADLINE:  UNTIL FILLED, SALARY: DOQ

Send or fax completed application, resume and cover letter to:
                        Attn:  Suzanne Tibbetts Young
                        Division of Indian Work
                        1001 East Lake Street
                        Minneapolis, MN 55407
                        Fax: 612-722-8669

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, EVERYONE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY

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8. Funding Alert

The Funding Alert provides a weekly synopsis of current fellowships, scholarships, and grants that may be used to address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual violence, and stalking.

To subscribe to the Funding Alert, email FundingAlert@pcadv.org with subject “Funding Alert.”

Current issue: Volume 5, Issue 1: October 13, 2009:
http://new.vawnet.org/Assoc_Files_VAWnet/FundingAlert-V5N1.pdf

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9. NSVRC Funding Opportunities

Another funding resource…be sure to bookmark the NSVRC (National Sexual Violence Resource Center) Funding Opportunities page to stay up to date on a variety of grant opportunities:
http://www.nsvrc.org/opportunities/funding

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10. Calendar

Note: for additional events (to attend or promote) link to the MN Center Against Violence and Abuse (MINCAVA) electronic clearinghouse:
http://www.mincava.umn.edu/types/11 (a great resource for MN events, articles, and more!)

October 19, 2009, Workshop: Working in Balance. Contact Nigel Perrote 612 722-8722 ext. 375

October 19-22, 2009, Midwest Conference on Child Sexual Abuse, Middleton, WI. Contact Jim Campbell (jcampbell@dcs.wisc.edu) or Denise Nolden (dnolden@dcs.wisc.edu).

Tuesday, October 27, 2009, Breaking Free 7th Annual Candle Light Vigil. Contact Joy @ 651-645-6557

October 28, 2009, Let’s Talk Month Resource Sharing Meeting. For questions and/or to RSVP, e-mail Emily Erickson (eerickson@ppmns.org) or call 612-821-6186.
 
October 29, 2009, Beyond Terminology: Gender Inclusive Sex Education. For more information and to register, contact Jill Farris at 651-644-1447 x18 or jill@moappp.org.

October 2009, Be There: Dads Matter, TPT Broadcasts. For more information contact:
Jan Hayne, Executive Director, Dads Make a Difference (jan@dadsmakeadifference.org)

October 2009, Hope for Trafficking Victims, TPT Broadcasts. For more information contact Civil Society, 651-291-0713 (www.civilsocietyhelps.org)
 
November 6, 2009, Sexual Violence Prevention Network (SVPN): Promoting Health and Healing: Addressing the Mental Health Impacts of Sexual Assault from an Advocacy Perspective. Contact: Amy Kenzie (amy.kenzie@state.mn.us)

November 12-13, 2009, Illinois Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers conference on pornography, Oak Brook, IL. For information link to: www.il-atsa.org

November 17, 2009, Prevent Child Abuse MN Videoconference Series: Emerging Research and Messages. Contact www.pcamn.org
 
February 5, 2010, Sexual Violence Prevention Network (SVPN). Contact: Amy Kenzie (amy.kenzie@state.mn.us)

March 6, 2010, International Women’s Day Celebration. For more information link to:
http://www.mnadvocates.org/International_Womens_Day_Celebration.html
 
May 14, 2010, Sexual Violence Prevention Network (SVPN). Contact: Amy Kenzie (amy.kenzie@state.mn.us)
 
August 13, 2010, Sexual Violence Prevention Network (SVPN). Contact: Amy Kenzie (amy.kenzie@state.mn.us)
 
November 5, 2010, Sexual Violence Prevention Network (SVPN). Contact: Amy Kenzie (amy.kenzie@state.mn.us)
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Please note: This distribution list is brought to you by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) with support from the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Contributed items are solely the responsibility of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent official views of, or endorsement by the MDH or the CDC.
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Amy Kenzie
Program Coordinator,
Sexual Violence Prevention Program
Injury and Violence Prevention Unit
Minnesota Department of Health
PO Box 64882
St. Paul, MN 55164-0882
Phone: 651-201-5410, FAX: 651/201-5800
e-mail: amy.kenzie@state.mn.us
www.health.state.mn.us/injury/topic/svp

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Sexual Violence Prevention Network E-News is brought to you by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) with support from the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Contributed items are solely the responsibility of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent official views of, or endorsement by the MDH or the CDC.


mdh logo
Sexual Violence Prevention Program
Injury and Violence Prevention Unit
Minnesota Department of Health
PO BOX 64882
ST PAUL MN 55164-0882
(651) 201-5484
injury.prevention@health.state.mn.us
www.health.state.mn.us/svp

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