Interpreter Roster: Spoken Language, Health Care

The Commissioner of Health maintains a statewide Roster of spoken language health care interpreters. Being listed on the Roster is voluntary. However, as of January 1, 2011, an interpreter cannot be paid from Medical Assistance and MinnesotaCare unless the interpreter is on the Roster.

The Roster can be searched to show the names and expiration dates of all spoken language interpreters who have applied to be on the Roster, though some interpreters choose not to be available to be contacted to provide interpreting services. The Roster can also be searched by language and geographic area to find available interpreters. For available interpreters, the Roster also shows health care subject areas and specialty settings in which the interpreter may have work experience.

The information in the Roster is provided by each interpreter and has NOT been verified by the Minnesota Department of Health. At this time, an interpreter need not show any qualifications to be included on the Roster. Inclusion on the Roster is NOT evidence of being a "certified" health care interpreter.

Click on the links below to find Frequently Asked Questions about the Roster, how to complete searches, to apply to be in the Roster, renew and to change or update interpreter information.


Important Notices

Legislative Report on Interpreting in Health Care Settings

The Minnesota Department of Health has published a report to the Minnesota Legislature regarding health care interpreting. It is available for download in PDF format at 2015 Legislative Report on Interpreting in Health Care Settings: Recommendations for a Tiered Registry (PDF: 3MB/114 pages).

The report details the MDH’s recommendations for a tiered, verified registry to replace the current Spoken Language Health Care Interpreter Roster. Please note that these recommendations do not change current laws. The Minnesota Legislature will review these recommendations in the coming months. They may choose to accept, reject or modify the recommendations to form a new law.

Our recommendations are a result of discussions with interpreters and other stakeholders in Minnesota, identification of best practices in medical interpreting across the nation, and an analysis of fiscal capacities within the department and appropriate fee levels for interpreters.

We have proposed these recommendations to the Legislature to better ensure that all limited English proficient (LEP) Minnesotans have access to quality medical care.

We would like to thank the more than 650 interpreters and stakeholders who have helped with this process in so many ways.

For reasons of safety, we encourage you not to meet with anyone outside of a health care setting, unless you can verify their identity and you meet in an area visible to the public.


Updated Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 09:10AM