Key Themes in 2014 - PPMRS - Minnesota Dept. of Health

Key Themes - 2014 Local Public Health Act Performance Measures

Each year, Minnesota community health boards report on performance measures related to the Local Public Health Act.

These measures were developed collaboratively through the work of Minnesota's state-local public health partnership, led by the SCHSAC Performance Improvement Steering Committee (PISC). PISC reviews the data reported each year, monitors progress toward improvement, and makes recommendations to focus system-wide improvement activities in a few key areas.

The Local Public Health Act performance measures span all six areas of public health responsibility. Many of the measures, particularly those highlighted below, reflect the characteristics of a high-performing health department; these are the characteristics to which we strive within the state-local partnership, in order to assure that everyone has access to high-quality public health services.

Key Themes
#1 - We see improvement across the board
#2 - Everyone, across the state, contributes to progress
#3 - We see the largest gains from working together
#4 - There are still differences in capacity at the local level
#5 - Opportunities to improve abound

We See Improvement Across the Board

National Public Health Measures

Between 2012 and 2014, Minnesota community health boards reported on a subset of 35 key public health national measures [i]. The SCHSAC Performance Improvement Steering Committee monitors community health boards' ability to achieve this subset of national measures as an indicator of overall capacity of the state's public health system. Figure 1, below, illustrates the state's collective progress toward meeting those key measures.

In 2012, Minnesota community health boards could fully meet only 37 percent of this subset of key national measures. Since 2012, community health boards' capacity to fully meet key national measures has nearly doubled, and Minnesota community health boards can now collectively meet 68 percent of the measures in the subset.

Figure 1. Key measures fully met by all Minnesota CHBs, 2012-2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 4 (PDF)

Organizational Quality Improvement

Community health boards also assess their performance on 10 items related to quality improvement (Figure 2).

Figure 2. Improvement on selected organizational QI maturity measures, Minnesota CHBs, 2012-2014

The combined responses on all 10 quality improvement measures is used to create an overall score (Figure 3), which shows how far each community health board has progressed toward integrating QI into everyday operations [ii].

Figure 3. Median quality improvement maturity score, Minnesota CHBs, 2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 34 (PDF)

Everyone, Across the State, Contributes to Progress

System-level gains in capacity are spread across the entire state—not just driven by a handful of high-capacity community health boards.

National Public Health Measures

Nearly all community health boards reported meeting more measures in 2014 than in 2012 (Figure 4) [iii].

Figure 4. Change in capacity to fully meet subset of key national public health measures, Minnesota CHBs, 2012-2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 4 (PDF)

Organizational Quality Improvement

A majority of community health boards also saw an increase in their QI maturity score between last year and this year (Figure 5).

Figure 5. Change in QI maturity score, Minnesota CHBs, 2013-2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 34 (PDF)

We See the Largest Gains from Working Together

National Public Health Measures

Collectively, as a system, our greatest gain among national public health measures has occurred in areas where MDH and community health boards have worked together to improve (Figures 6-8).

Figure 6. Progress meeting key national public health measures related to community health improvement plans, Minnesota CHBs, 2012-2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 14 (PDF)
View Minnesota CHIPs: Community Health Improvement Plans

Figure 7. Progress meeting key national public health measures related to strategic planning, Minnesota CHBs, 2012-2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 14 (PDF)

Figure 8. Progress meeting key national public health measure related to a QI plan or program, Minnesota CHBs, 2012-2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 14 (PDF)

There are Still Differences in Capacity at the Local Level

National Public Health Measures

Community health boards vary widely in their ability to meet national public health measures.

Community health boards grouped in the first quartile of Figure 9 can collectively meet a greater number of measures than those found in the fourth quartile.

Figure 9. Capacity of Minnesota CHBs to meet 100 national public health measures, 2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 4 (PDF)

Health Equity

Local public health staff and community health boards play a vital role in reducing the disparities in health outcomes among Minnesotans, partly through their work to address health equity and social determinants of health (Figure 10).

Figure 10. Selected CHB work toward health equity, by population, Minnesota, 2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 32 (PDF)

Immunization Strategies

Figure 11. Selected strategies used to increase immunization rates, Minn. CHBs, 2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 56 (PDF)

Opportunities to Improve Abound

National Public Health Measures

The SCHSAC Performance Improvement Steering Committee believes Minnesota's public health system will grow stronger when more community health boards can fully meet national public health measures (Figure 12, green), and fewer community health boards cannot meet those measures (yellow and red).

Figure 12. Key measures fully met by all Minnesota CHBs, 2012-2014

Learn more in the data book: Start on p. 4 (PDF)

For more information on top opportunities, visit the Center for Public Health Practice Publication Database to read Information to Action: Using Data to Improve the Public Health System (January 2016), in which the SCHSAC Performance Improvement Steering Committee outlines opportunities for improvement in 2016.

Endnotes

i. In 2012-2013, MDH used 35 key measures from PHAB Standards and Measures v1.0 to assess community health board capacity. In 2014, MDH used the revised PHAB Standards and Measures v1.5 to assess capacity; in v1.5, PHAB combined two measures into one, resulting in a total of 34 measures. [return to text]

ii. The following community health boards are not included due to governance changes between 2012 and 2014: Horizon, Kandiyohi-Renville, Nobles, Polk-Norman-Mahnomen, SWHHS (Southwest Health and Human Services). [return to text]

iii. The following community health boards are not included due to governance changes between 2012 and 2014: Kandiyohi-Renville, Partnership4Health, Polk-Norman-Mahnomen, SWHHS (Southwest Health and Human Services). [return to text]