Annual and Biennial Reports: Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control (IDEPC) Division

Annual and Biennial Reports: Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control (IDEPC) Division

Current report:

On behalf of the Infectious Disease Epidemiology Prevention and Control (IDEPC) Division of the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH), I am pleased to present the 2017-2018 edition of the IDEPC Biennial report (our 4th report). This report provides a snapshot of the significant and diverse work we do as part of our agency mission to protect, maintain and improve the health of all Minnesotans.

The 100th anniversary of 1918 pandemic (highlighted in photos) is a testament to how far we have come in understanding infectious diseases. We now have the ability to test for and treat influenza. The article on influenza describes how we monitor for this disease in Minnesota.

Our work is often in the news; some of the articles describe outbreaks you may have read about, such as the 2017 measles outbreak, which was the largest in the United States and the largest in Minnesota in nearly 30 years. However, there is much important work done in the division that does not make the evening news. This report provides a window on that work as well. Check out the article on our planning for Super Bowl 52 and the Safer F.A.C.E.s agritourism education project.
I encourage you to read more to learn about the exceptional (and interesting) work of the infectious disease staff and how they contribute to keeping all Minnesotans healthy!

Kristen R. Ehresmann, RN, MPH
Director
Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division

Past reports:

I am pleased to introduce the 2015-2016 biennial report of the Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control (IDEPC) Division at the Minnesota Department of Health. The IDEPC Division is responsible for responding to approximately 90 infectious diseases that are reportable to us by law, Minnesota Rules 4605.7000 (see page 2). This report highlights several activities of the Division but is only a snapshot of the breadth of infectious disease work happening across the Division.

Responding to, monitoring the occurrence of, and developing strategies for preventing and controlling infectious diseases is both demanding and exciting work. Every year brings new challenges and lessons. Over the last two years we responded to diseases new to us (Zika, MERS) and to well known diseases that are re-emerging (mumps, syphilis). Our ability to respond is directly related to our existing infrastructure. Much of our work is driven by federal expectations and requirements; over 92 percent of the Division’s work is federally funded through grants. About 7 percent of our activities are supported by the State General Fund, and less than 1 percent of our work is funded by State Government Special Revenue (SGSR) funds.

It was another successful biennium for IDEPC. I would like to thank the staff of IDEPC for their excellent work as well as our partners in local public health, health care, and community groups who make our success possible.

Kristen R. Ehresmann, RN, MPH
Director
Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division

It is my pleasure to present the 2013-14 biennial report of the Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control (IDEPC) Division at the Minnesota Department of Health. In our division, we monitor the occurrence of infectious diseases, develop strategies for preventing and controlling disease, and work to put those strategies into action. All Minnesotans are served by the work of IDEPC.

From H5N1 influenza to Ebola, the media has been filled with reports of infectious diseases. This report summarizes our work to control infectious disease in Minnesota and captures high points over the last two years.

Among the IDEPC activities spotlighted in this year’s report are:

  • Monitoring travelers returning from Ebola-affected areas for Ebola in Minnesota.
  • Linking people to health care and needed treatment.
  • Protecting Minnesotans from disease through changes in law, collaboration with partners, and strengthening infrastructure.
  • Building relationships with community media to provide timely health information to diverse audiences.
  • Supporting community efforts to prevent disease.

This report represents only a snapshot of the infectious disease work done in IDEPC.

I would like to congratulate the staff of IDEPC for all their hard work and to commend them for their skill, dedication, and professionalism in service to the people of the state of Minnesota. Special thanks to our communication team for pulling this report together!

I invite you to read more about the important work our division does to help us meet our agency mission to protect, maintain, and improve the health of all Minnesotans.

Kristen R. Ehresmann, RN, MPH
Director
Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division

I am pleased to introduce the first annual report of the Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division (IDEPC) at the Minnesota Department of Health. Our mission is to protect, maintain, and improve the health of all Minnesotans. In our division, we monitor the occurrence of infectious diseases, develop strategies for preventing and controlling disease, and work to put those strategies into action. All Minnesotans are served by the work of IDEPC.

Organizationally, IDEPC is divided into three sections: the Acute Disease Investigation and Control (ADIC) Section, the Immunization, Tuberculosis and International Health (ITIH) Section, and the STD and HIV Section. Additionally, we have eight field epidemiologists working in district offices across the state.

This is an exciting and important time to work in the area of infectious disease.

Today’s infectious disease challenges are broader and more complex. The diversity of organisms and their ability to evolve and adapt to changing populations, environments, and technologies creates ongoing threats to health as well as challenges to disease prevention and control activities. International travel and immigration has created the potential for rapid transmission of infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza and measles; antibiotic resistance has made treatment of STDs more difficult; changes in climate can cause infectious diseases to emerge in new areas; human encroachment on wilderness areas increase the contact with zoonotic and vectorborne diseases such as Lyme disease and West Nile; and racial and ethnic health disparities continue for many diseases, including HIV.

I am grateful for a dedicated staff in IDEPC; their hard work, skill and professionalism ensure Minnesota is ready to meet the infectious disease challenges of the future.

I invite you to read our annual report to learn more about the work of our division during 2012.

Kristen R. Ehresmann, RN, MPH
Director
Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division

Updated Wednesday, 05-Jun-2019 08:38:27 CDT