Monitor and Revise CHIP - Minnesota Dept. of Health

Monitor and Revise Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP Annual Report)

A community health improvement plan is a living document that a community health board routinely reviews, monitors, and updates based on progress, changing needs, and priorities. Community health boards can use performance management to monitor and revise the community health improvement plan over the course of the five-year Assessment and Planning cycle.

DeliverableCommunity health boards will send their descriptions of how they monitor and revise the community health improvement plan to MDH as a deliverable in spring 2020.

The 2017 and 2018 Performance-Related Accountability Requirements also ask community health boards to send this report to MDH. Find a checklist and optional template below.

Background
MDH Assistance
Monitor Work Plan Progress
Collect, Analyze, and Report Data
Engage and Communicate with Stakeholders
Revise and Update the Community Health Improvement Plan

Annual Report Template
Related National Public Health Accreditation Standards
Further Resources

 

Background

A comprehensive implementation plan helps community health boards describe how to achieve the goals and objectives in the community health improvement plan.

At minimum, monitoring and revising the community health improvement plan means making this implementation plan operational. This typically involves (but not necessarily in this order):

  • Monitoring work plan progress
  • Collecting, analyzing, and reporting on performance data
  • Engaging and communicating with stakeholders
  • Conducting quality improvement efforts
  • Revising the community health improvement plan as appropriate

Public Health Accreditation Board Measure 5.2.4 requires community health boards to:

Monitor and revise, as needed, the strategies in the community health improvement plan in collaboration with broad participation from stakeholders and partners.

While community health boards in Minnesota are not required to submit a report to MDH each year, they may find an annual report helpful to communicate progress with stakeholders. Community health boards should report their progress within the organization, to community health advisory committees, to county boards, to community partners, and to the public.

Further, the Commissioner of Health, in consultation with the State Community Health Services Advisory Committee (SCHSAC), selected 5.2.4 as the annual Performance-Related Accountability Requirement for 2016, 2017, and 2018; this asks community health boards to submit a report on progress implementing the community health improvement plan. You can find more information on the Performance-Related Accountability Requirement online, including a webinar, templates, and tools.

Performance-Related Accountability Requirements

 

MDH Assistance

MDH has designed all Assessment and Planning guidance to help community health boards meet national public health standards developed by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB).

Staff from the MDH Center for Public Health Practice can help you use performance management to monitor and revise your community health improvement plan, as well as meet the Performance-Related Accountability Requirement. To contact MDH, visit: Help and Technical Assistance.

Performance Management

Performance Management CycleThe MDH Performance Management model can help you walk through using performance management to monitor and revise your community health improvement plan.

Where do we want to be? Strong community health improvement plans have clear goals and SMART objectives.

How will we know? Community health improvement plans require measurement to monitor progress.

How well are we doing? Community health boards should monitor their plans, document progress, and communicate with stakeholders to monitor progress.

How will we improve? Change course as needed, based on monitoring progress.

 

Monitor Work Plan Progress

Your partnership will have created a work plan (action plan, implementation plan) to outline how it will achieve the community health improvement plan’s goals and objectives. Your community health board can monitor progress by tracking whether partners complete action steps on time, and by considering course corrections if work does not proceed as planned.

 

Collect, Analyze, and Report Data

A strong community health improvement plan has several performance measures to signify progress over time. Your partnership will use the data you collect to determine whether you meet these performance measures.

Your work plan should address how you collect this data, where and how you will track data and measures, who will analyze the data and when, and who needs to be informed of progress.

Collect data that describes your population and your performance.

  • Population Health Indicator
    • Describes your population
    • Ties directly to a health priority or goal
    • Note that some data may simply be population-level data, and not specific to health
  • Performance Measure
    • Describes your performance: How much did we do? How well did we do it? Is our customer better off?
    • Should be a number, percentage, or other standards unit
    • Monitor performance measures more frequently than population health indicators

Work with stakeholders to explain the data and figure out what it means. Reflect on:

  • What’s the story behind the numbers?
  • How does actual performance compare to the standard or target?
  • What contributes to or impedes progress?
  • Is corrective action necessary?

 

Engage and Communicate with Stakeholders

You can increase transparency and foster buy-in from internal and external stakeholders by keeping them informed on progress. Keep staff and partners engaged by doing things like (but not limited to):

  • Send internal updates to all staff on plan progress
  • Publish annual reports on progress, and disseminate results to the community
  • Hold a community listening session

 

Revise and Update the Community Health Improvement Plan

Based on the steps you have conducted above, update and revise your community health improvement plan in partnership with your community to better meet your capacity, resources, and local context.

You may only need to make minor adjustments to the plan. You may add entirely new strategies. You may completely revise the plan, wholesale. Make revisions as necessary, based on:

  • Analysis of performance data
  • Implemented strategies
  • Changes in population health indicators
  • New/emerging health issues
  • Changes in resources

Most community health boards revise the community health improvement plan in conjunction with completing an annual report on progress, but it is not necessary to do so—you can revise the community health improvement plan at any point in time.

 

CHIP Annual Report Template (Optional)

For more information on this report as it serves as the Performance Related-Accountability Measure, visit: Accountability Requirements of the Local Public Health Act.

Note: An annual report is intended for use by the community health board and its community partners. Local health departments find that an annual report is a useful document to provide updates to community stakeholders (including advisory committees and governing boards) or for sharing with community members who may be interested in the progress of the community health improvement plan. The annual report should consider the other audiences the community health board may want to share the report with. Submission of this report to the Minnesota Department of Health meets the documentation requirement for the performance-related accountability measure (PHAB Measure 5.2.4).

 

Related National Public Health Accreditation Standards

5.2.4. Monitor and revise as needed, the strategies in the community health improvement plan in collaboration with broad participation from stakeholders and partners.

Related documentation:

  • Report on progress made in implementing strategies in the community health improvement plan
  • Review and revision, as necessary, of the health improvement plan strategies based on results of the assessment

 

Further Resources