Announcements - EH: Minnesota Department of Health

Toxic Free Kids Act
Announcements

Find announcements related to children's environmental here or sign-up for Toxic Free Kids email updates.

Newly Released: 2022 Update to the Minnesota Chemicals of High Concern List

July 11, 2022

Minnesota Department of Health’s Toxic Free Kids program published the fourth update to the Chemicals of High Concern list. As required by legislation, this list must be reviewed and revised at least every three years. Details of the 2022 review and revision process can be found on the Toxic Free Kids Reports page.

The current and updated 2022 Chemicals of High Concern list can be found on the Toxic Free Kids Chemicals of High Concern page.
For questions, contact MDH at Health.Risk@state.mn.us or 651-201-4899.

Consumer Product Notice: Lead and Cadmium in Spinning Battle Toys

November 26, 2019

Spinning battle toys in packaging and out of packaging

Above image: Sample of name-brand and off-brand spinning battle toys.

The Minnesota Chemicals in Products Interagency Team (CPIT) tested 50 spinning battle toys for lead and cadmium. Fifteen of these toys showed levels of concern. Read and share the Consumer Product Notice: Spinning Battle Toys (PDF) for details.

2019 Minnesota Chemicals of High Concern List Update

June 28, 2019

Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) completed the 2019 Minnesota Chemicals of High Concern Report (PDF) detailing the third review and revision process for the Minnesota Chemicals of High Concern list. This report also describes the Toxic Free Kids program updates and Chemicals in Products Interagency Team activities.

State of Minnesota continues to take action to stop the sale of toxic kids' jewelry

March 19, 2019

Following the 2017 investigation (PDF) of children's jewelry for lead and cadmium, the Chemicals in Products Interagency Team (CPIT) conducted a second study in 2018. One product, a girl's clothing set with metal pendant, resulted in a national recall.

girls clothing with metal pendant

Do not allow children to put metallic objects, like jewelry or keys, into their mouth.

For more detailed health information, see educational handout Lead and Cadmium in Children’s Jewelry (PDF) and Lead Infographic (PDF).

Updated Tuesday, 26-Jul-2022 19:57:56 CDT