Data-MCRS Cancer Statistics and Reports - Minnesota Department of Health

Data - MCRS Cancer Statistics and Reports

Annual incidence data for 20 common cancer types are available on MDH’s Minnesota Public Health Data Access Portal.

Facilities, laboratories and hospitals seeking information about how to report cancers to the MCRS will find it on the Reporting Cancer page.

Cancer Quick Facts

These quick facts give a snapshot of the impact of diseases and conditions in Minnesota.

Current Presentations

Current Publications

Current Minnesota Cancer Reporting System (MCRS) Reports are linked. Titles listed without a link are archived. All reports are archived after five years from the date of distribution.

  • MCRS Biennial reports to the legislature are retained at the Minnesota Legislative Reference Library.
  • MCRS reports are transferred to the State Archives collection at the Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS). Some reports can be searched for by using the online library catalog or viewed in the Gail Family Library at 345 Kellogg Boulevard, St Paul, MN.

Archived Cancer Statistics and Other Reports published by the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System (MCRS), formerly Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System (MCSS), are available upon request.

If you would like a copy of any of the archived reports, please send an email to health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

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This legislative report describes the occurrence of cancer in Minnesota from 1988 through 2015. It presents incidence and mortality statistics for all cancers combined and colorectal cancers. Each section of the report includes cancer incidence and mortality rates by age group, sex, race and ethnicity, and stage at diagnosis for incident colorectal cancers. The report also includes 10-year trends in incidence and mortality for these cancers. The report’s findings suggest both successes in and opportunities for cancer prevention, control, and research in Minnesota. There are two supplements to this year’s report. The first supplement provides county-level maps and the corresponding age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates. The second contains a bibliography of reports and publications.

Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-2015 (PDF)

Supplement 1-Maps and Data (PDF)

Supplement 2-Publications and Data Use (PDF)

Distribution Date: April 2019

Report was submitted to the Minnesota Legislature for State Fiscal Year 2019.

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

This legislative report describes the occurrence of cancer in Minnesota from 1988 through 2014. It presents incidence and mortality statistics for all cancers combined and several common cancers that have ongoing active screening or intervention programs: colorectal, female breast, lung, cervix, and melanomas of the skin. Each section of the report contains descriptive statistics by cancer stage, age group, sex, race and ethnicity, and documents trends in incidence and mortality rates over time. The content should be especially useful to state and local public health professionals, legislators, and policy and program planners in developing, funding, and carrying out and evaluating cancer prevention and control activities in Minnesota.

Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-2014 (PDF)

Distribution Date: October 2018

Report was submitted to the Minnesota Legislature for State Fiscal Year 2017.

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

Below you will find a list of archived biennial reports produced by the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at the Minnesota Department of Health. These reports are greater than five years old.

  • Minnesota Cancer Facts & Figures 2015
    Distribution Date: October 2015
    Report was submitted to the Minnesota Legislature for State Fiscal Year 2015
  • Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-2009
    Distribution Date: December 2012
  • Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-2008
    Distribution Date: March 2012
  • Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-2006
    Distribution Date: December 2010
  • Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-2004
    Distribution Date: September 2008
  • Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-2002
    Distribution Date: October 2005
  • Cancer in Minnesota, 1988-1999
    Distribution Date: March 2003
  • The Occurrence of Cancer in MN 1992-1997: Incidence, Mortality, Trends
    Distribution Date: October 2001
  • The Occurrence of Cancer in MN 1988-1996: Incidence, Mortality, Trends
    Distribution Date: August 1999
  • The Occurrence of Cancer in MN 1988-1994: Incidence, Mortality, Trends
    Distribution Date: May 1997
  • The Occurrence of Cancer in MN 1988-1992: Incidence, Mortality, Trends
    Distribution Date: March 1995
  • The Occurrence of Cancer in MN 1988-1990: Incidence, Mortality, and Trends
    Distribution Date: February 1993
  • The Occurrence of Cancer in MN 1988
    Distribution Date: December 1990

Other MCRS Reports

Below you will find a list of the most recent cancer reports produced by the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at the Minnesota Department of Health.

Background

There have been cancer concerns among many New Brighton and St. Anthony residents related to a history of possible exposure to industrial pollutants from the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant. The purpose of this report is to provide a complete and accurate profile of cancer occurrence among residents of the two cities. Data from the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System (MCRS) were used to compare cancer rates among individuals living in the census tracts of interest at the time of their diagnosis with cancer rates in the seven county Twin Cities metropolitan area during the most recent 10-year period for which complete data were available (2007-2016).

Findings

During the 10-years, there were 914 new cancers diagnosed in males and 1000 new cancers diagnosed in females. A majority of the cancer rates in the area of analysis were virtually identical to metro area rates. The number of total cancers observed in males was 9% lower than expected. Among the common cancer types, the number of lung cancer diagnoses in males was 27% lower than expected. The number of observed cancers among females did not differ from expected. Due to their smaller numbers and greater variability (over time or from one location to another), the rates of specific types of cancer at a community (or even county) level are generally much less stable or informative and permit few conclusions. The number of residents in the study area currently living with any history of cancer likely exceeds 2000 individuals.

Cancer in Minnesota

While environmental contaminants are the frequent focus of community cancer concerns, the primary determinants of cancer risk include smoking, obesity, diet, lack of exercise, UV radiation, alcohol, viruses, genetics, reproductive history, medications, and occupation.

Cancer Occurrence in New Brighton, St. Anthony (PDF)

Distribution Date: July 2019

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

Background

There have been cancer concerns among many Fridley and Spring Lake Park residents related to a history of possible exposure to Trichloroethylene (TCE) in drinking water. The purpose of this report is to provide a complete and accurate profile of cancer occurrence among residents living in the nine census tracts surrounding the Armory-Superfund site. Data from the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System (MCRS) were used to compare cancer rates among individuals living in the census tracts of interest at the time of their diagnosis with cancer rates in the seven county Twin Cities metropolitan area during the most recent 10-year period for which complete data were available (2007-2016).

Findings

A majority of the cancer rates in the area of analysis were virtually identical to Metro-area rates. There were however some elevations observed. In males the elevation counts were for colorectal, esophageal and Hodgkin’s lymphoma cancer sites. In females the elevated counts were for all cancer sites combines as well as bladder, colorectal and lung cancer sites. The results are similar to a previous analysis of cancer rates in Fridley based on zip codes performed in 2012. Elevations in lung, bladder, esophageal cancers, and colorectal cancers are likely explained by differences in the prevalence of modifiable lifestyle risk factors (notably smoking and colonoscopy screening) in Fridley/Spring Lake Park versus the 7-County Metro area. The small numbers of Hodgkin’s lymphoma diagnosed over the 10-year period are less informative and permit few conclusions.

Cancer in Minnesota

Due to their smaller numbers and greater variability (over time or from one location to another), the rates of specific types of cancer at a community (or even county) level are generally much less stable or informative and permit few conclusions. The number of residents in the study area currently living with any history of cancer likely exceeds 2000 individuals. While environmental contaminants are the frequent focus of community cancer concerns, the primary determinants of cancer risk include smoking, obesity, diet, lack of exercise, UV radiation, alcohol, viruses, genetics, reproductive history, medications, and occupation.

Cancer Occurrence, Fridley, Spring Lake Park (PDF)

Distribution Date: July 2019

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

Background

There have been cancer concerns among many White Bear Township, White Bear Lake and Gem Lake area residents related to past releases of Trichloroethylene (TCE) to the air by the Water Gremlin facility. The purpose of this report is to provide a complete and accurate profile of cancer occurrence among residents living in the surrounding the five census tracts Water Gremlin facility. Data from the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System (MCRS) was used to compare cancer rates among individuals living in the census tracts surrounding the facility at the time of their diagnosis with cancer rates in the seven county Twin Cities metropolitan area during the most recent 10-year period for which complete data were available (2007-2016).

Findings

Overall cancer rates in the area of analysis were virtually identical to Metro-area rates. For both genders combined, 970 cancers were diagnosed over the 10-year period, compared to the expected number of 978.

Due to their smaller numbers and greater variability (over time or from one location to another), the rates of specific types of cancer at a community (or even county) level are generally much less stable or informative and permit few conclusions. No excesses or deficits of cancers were observed in the ten years of data. The number of residents in the study area currently living with any history of cancer likely exceeds 940 individuals.

Cancer in Minnesota

While environmental contaminants are the frequent focus of community cancer concerns, the primary determinants of cancer risk include smoking, obesity, diet, lack of exercise, UV radiation, alcohol, viruses, genetics, reproductive history, medications, and occupation.

Cancer Occurrence, White Bear Township, White Bear Lake and Gem Lake Area (PDF)

Distribution Date: March 2019

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

Cancer Incidence in Dakota and Washington Counties

In response to concerns about cancer and the presence of perfluorochemicals (PFCs) in drinking water supplies in the eastern Metro area communities, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) has twice examined cancer incidence in Dakota County and Washington County.

MDH released the first report in 2007, which was followed by an updated report in 2015. While community cancer rates have a high degree of statistical uncertainty and must be interpreted cautiously, these reports can be useful to address public concerns over cancer rates in a county or a community by providing a complete and accurate profile of cancer occurrence.

Recent concerns arising from media coverage of the State of Minnesota lawsuit against 3M, prompted MDH to re-examine and expand on the two previous reports of cancer incidence in Washington and Dakota Counties, and eight communities within those counties.

Analysis

The cancer experience of Dakota and Washington County residents is not unusual compared with the State of Minnesota as a whole. For many cancer types, the number of cancers occurring in the two counties did not differ from the numbers expected.

MDH staff evaluated the two counties separately, across two time periods – 1988 to 2002 and 2003 to 2012. The analysis covered 24 cancer types in males – all cancers combined and 23 specific types, and 26 cancer types in females – all cancers combined and 24 specific types.

Out of the 200 analyses of county cancer rates compared to statewide rates, 173 of the comparisons showed no differences in the rates. County cancer incidence was lower than the statewide rates in 15 analyses and higher than statewide rates in 12 analyses.

The reports also examined cancer incidence for eight communities within the region that had known or potential drinking water contamination. Due to the very small numbers, cancer rates could only be examined for the more common types of cancer. For all eight communities combined, the rate of only one of the 14 types of cancer differed from rates in the Metro area communities overall. That cancer was lower than the Metro area rate.

While these analyses are instructive, the department only examined data for two potential health outcomes: birth outcomes and cancer. MDH has not collected public health data on other types of potential health effects reported in the scientific literature, such as liver and kidney effects, thyroid disease, or immune system changes. While MDH’s water guidance values protect against all of these effects, data on their occurrence in people are not available.

Cancer in Minnesota

Cancers are much more common than most people realize. In Minnesota each year, there are roughly 26,000 new cancer cases. That means about one out of two Minnesotans will be diagnosed with a potentially serious cancer during his or her lifetime.

Cancer is not just one disease, it's more than 100 different diseases. Each cancer has its own traits, progression, risk factors or causes, treatment, and chances of survival. Cancer risk depends greatly on age, lifestyle – smoking, alcohol use, obesity, what you eat or don't eat, amount of exercise, getting too much sun – and on family history of cancer.

Some environmental factors represent a small fraction of cancer risk, including pollution, secondhand smoke, exposure to chemicals at work and radon gas in our homes and workplaces. Even though environmental exposures to contaminants are a smaller contributor to overall cancer risk, we can reduce that risk. MDH supports steps to identify and reduce or eliminate exposures where possible.

Efforts to Reduce or Eliminate Exposures

MDH is responsible for ensuring safe drinking water for all Minnesotans. One way MDH does this is through regular testing of public water supplies for contaminants. MDH also works with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) to investigate situations where groundwater contaminants may affect private wells.

From 2008 to 2014, MDH led a biomonitoring study that tracked blood levels of PFCs in people who live in the East Metro.

The biomonitoring study results show that:

  • PFC blood levels are going down in long-term residents who were exposed to PFCs in drinking water before the 2006 public health intervention. That intervention, including installing filtration systems for polluted public and private wells, reduced PFCs in drinking water to below health-based limits.
  • PFC levels in newer residents – who moved to Oakdale after the intervention – are similar to levels seen elsewhere in the U.S.

For more information, see PFAS Biomonitoring in the East Metro page.

The Minnesota Cancer Reporting System (MCRS) is Minnesota’s statewide, population-based cancer registry. MCRS systematically collects demographic, diagnostic and treatment information on all Minnesota residents with newly diagnosed cancers.

Brief Update on Cancer Occurrence in East Metro Communities (PDF)

Distribution Date: February 2018

Data Update: Cancer Incidence in Dakota and Washington Counties

Distribution Date: June 2015

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

A request in February 2016 for cancer rates in several neighborhoods in North and Northeast Minneapolis led to the Minnesota Department of Health analysis of cancer incidence rates and other relevant data from 2003 to 2012 for these communities. While community cancer rates have a high degree of statistical uncertainty and must be interpreted cautiously, such data are also very useful in addressing public concerns over cancer rates in a county or a community by providing a more complete and accurate profile of cancer occurrence.

This MDH analysis found that the North Minneapolis neighborhoods included in ZIP codes 55411 and 55412 had a greater overall cancer incidence when compared to the metro area but did not have a significantly different cancer burden compared to the broader African American community in the metro area. African Americans comprised 8.6 percent of the Twin Cities Metro in 2010 but made up nearly 46 percent of the population in North Minneapolis.

In contrast, the Northeast Neighborhood ZIP codes (55413, 55418) with a racial makeup more similar to the metro area had only had one significantly elevated cancer, liver cancer, among males, when compared to the metro area.

Rates of individual cancer types tend to vary substantially over time within small geographic areas. It is not unusual to find that several types of cancer occurred more or less often than expected within a zip code area over a period of several years. What is noteworthy about these findings is that cancers of several types occurred more often than expected in North Minneapolis, and that numbers of cases were roughly doubled for four of these cancers; liver and larynx in males, and larynx and esophagus in females.

Differences in cancer incidence rates by race, ethnicity, and gender have been well-documented throughout the U.S. as well as in Minnesota. The pattern of rates in the North Minneapolis communities was generally consistent with these known differences. The elevated cancer rates in North Minneapolis are similar to the cancer rates for African Americans in other parts of the Twin Cities metro area, where African Americans have much higher incidence rates of some cancers, such as cervical cancer, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer.

Creating Opportunities for Health

This finding highlights an opportunity to improve public health prevention efforts because these cancers are associated with well-known, preventable risk factors such as smoking, living in a household with a smoker, alcohol use, obesity, dietary habits, and hepatitis and HPV infection rates.

This analysis demonstrates the need for a cancer reduction approach in the African American community and North Minneapolis that pairs targeted action steps and broader efforts to address social and economic factors. African American and North Minneapolis cancer reduction efforts should focus on increasing access to healthy foods, campaigns to combat hepatitis infection and increase HPV vaccination, smoking prevention, particularly related to menthol cigarettes, and reduced use of alcohol and increased access to chemical dependency treatment. To succeed, these more targeted efforts must occur in a broader context of addressing the complex and longstanding barriers to improving income and education that prevent populations of color and American Indian communities from gaining equal access to opportunities to attain optimal health.

Cancer Occurrence in North/Northeast Communities of Minneapolis, July 2016 (PDF)

Distribution Date: July 2016

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

 

There have been long-standing cancer concerns among many St. Louis Park residents related to drinking water contamination and a federal Superfund site in the city. This report provides an accurate and complete profile on cancer occurrence among St. Louis Park residents.

This detailed study encompasses 20 years of cancer data and firmly establishes that overall cancer incidence and mortality rates in St. Louis Park are virtually identical to cancer rates in the Twin Cities Metro area.

Cancer Occurrence in St. Louis Park

This report provides a background of the history, extending back over 30 years, of responding to community concerns about cancer rates and risks in the community.

Addressing current concerns, the Minnesota Department of Health analyzed data from the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System comparing cancer rates among individuals living in St. Louis Park at the time of their diagnosis with cancer rates in the Twin Cities metropolitan area during the most recent twenty-year period for which complete data were available (1993-2012).

Overall cancer rates in St. Louis Park were virtually identical to Metro-area rates. For both genders combined, 5,523 cancers were diagnosed over the 20-year period, compared to the expected number of 5,499. An average of 276 newly-diagnosed cancers occurred each year, and overall cancer death rates were also comparable to those of the Metro area.

Because many cancers have high rates of survivorship, the number of people who are currently living with some previous history of cancer in a community the size of St. Louis Park is likely to exceed 2,200.

Cancer in Minnesota

Cancers are much more common than most people realize. In Minnesota each year, there are roughly 26,000 new cancer cases. That means about one out of two Minnesotans will be diagnosed with a potentially serious cancer during his or her lifetime.

When you or someone you know develops cancer, it is natural to want to know the cause.

The challenge is that cancer is not just one disease, it’s more than 100 different diseases. Each cancer has its own traits, progression, risk factors or causes, treatment, and chances of survival.

While environmental contaminants are the frequent focus of community cancer concerns, the primary determinants of cancer risk include smoking, obesity, diet, lack of exercise, UV radiation, alcohol, viruses, genetics, reproductive history, medications, and occupation.

Clean environments create healthier communities and the Minnesota Department of Health works across the state to address environmental concerns and provide all the answers we can.

The good news is we can act to prevent cancer and cancer deaths. Screening and early diagnosis also help diagnose cancer at an early stage when it’s more likely to be treated successfully, before it’s had the chance to get too big or spread.

Cancer Occurrence in St. Louis Park, 1993-2012 (PDF)

Distribution Date: March 2016

If you have questions about this report, contact the Minnesota Cancer Reporting System at health.mcrs@state.mn.us.

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Updated Tuesday, 30-Jul-2019 10:06:51 CDT